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An 18-mo randomized trial of a low-glycemic-index diet and weight change in Brazilian women.
Am J Clin Nutr 2007; 86(3):707-13AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Despite interest in the glycemic index diets as an approach to weight control, few long-term evaluations are available.

OBJECTIVE

The objective was to investigate the long-term effect of a low-glycemic-index (LGI) diet compared with that of a high-glycemic-index (HGI) diet; all other dietary components were equal.

DESIGN

After a 6-wk run-in, we randomly assigned 203 healthy women [body mass index (in kg/m2): 23-30] aged 25-45 y to an LGI or an HGI diet with a small energy restriction. The primary outcome measure was weight change at 18 mo. Secondary outcomes included hunger and fasting insulin and lipids.

RESULTS

Despite requiring a run-in and the use of multiple incentives, only 60% of the subjects completed the study. The difference in glycemic index between the diets was approximately 35-40 units (40 compared with 79) during all 18 mo of follow-up, and the carbohydrate intake from energy remained at approximately 60% in both groups. The LGI group had a slightly greater weight loss in the first 2 mo of follow-up (-0.72 compared with -0.31 kg), but after 12 mo of follow-up both groups began to regain weight. After 18 mo, the weight change was not significantly different (P = 0.93) between groups (LGI: -0.41 kg; HGI: -0.26 kg). A greater reduction was observed in the LGI diet group for triacylglycerol (difference = -16.4 mg/dL; P = 0.11) and VLDL cholesterol (difference = -3.7 mg/dL; P = 0.03).

CONCLUSIONS

Long-term weight changes were not significantly different between the HGI and LGI diet groups; therefore, this study does not support a benefit of an LGI diet for weight control. Favorable changes in lipids confirmed previous results.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, Institute of Social Medicine, State University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. sichieri@ims.uerj.brNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17823436

Citation

Sichieri, Rosely, et al. "An 18-mo Randomized Trial of a Low-glycemic-index Diet and Weight Change in Brazilian Women." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 86, no. 3, 2007, pp. 707-13.
Sichieri R, Moura AS, Genelhu V, et al. An 18-mo randomized trial of a low-glycemic-index diet and weight change in Brazilian women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2007;86(3):707-13.
Sichieri, R., Moura, A. S., Genelhu, V., Hu, F., & Willett, W. C. (2007). An 18-mo randomized trial of a low-glycemic-index diet and weight change in Brazilian women. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 86(3), pp. 707-13.
Sichieri R, et al. An 18-mo Randomized Trial of a Low-glycemic-index Diet and Weight Change in Brazilian Women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2007;86(3):707-13. PubMed PMID: 17823436.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - An 18-mo randomized trial of a low-glycemic-index diet and weight change in Brazilian women. AU - Sichieri,Rosely, AU - Moura,Anibal S, AU - Genelhu,Virginia, AU - Hu,Frank, AU - Willett,Walter C, PY - 2007/9/8/pubmed PY - 2008/3/8/medline PY - 2007/9/8/entrez SP - 707 EP - 13 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 86 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Despite interest in the glycemic index diets as an approach to weight control, few long-term evaluations are available. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to investigate the long-term effect of a low-glycemic-index (LGI) diet compared with that of a high-glycemic-index (HGI) diet; all other dietary components were equal. DESIGN: After a 6-wk run-in, we randomly assigned 203 healthy women [body mass index (in kg/m2): 23-30] aged 25-45 y to an LGI or an HGI diet with a small energy restriction. The primary outcome measure was weight change at 18 mo. Secondary outcomes included hunger and fasting insulin and lipids. RESULTS: Despite requiring a run-in and the use of multiple incentives, only 60% of the subjects completed the study. The difference in glycemic index between the diets was approximately 35-40 units (40 compared with 79) during all 18 mo of follow-up, and the carbohydrate intake from energy remained at approximately 60% in both groups. The LGI group had a slightly greater weight loss in the first 2 mo of follow-up (-0.72 compared with -0.31 kg), but after 12 mo of follow-up both groups began to regain weight. After 18 mo, the weight change was not significantly different (P = 0.93) between groups (LGI: -0.41 kg; HGI: -0.26 kg). A greater reduction was observed in the LGI diet group for triacylglycerol (difference = -16.4 mg/dL; P = 0.11) and VLDL cholesterol (difference = -3.7 mg/dL; P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: Long-term weight changes were not significantly different between the HGI and LGI diet groups; therefore, this study does not support a benefit of an LGI diet for weight control. Favorable changes in lipids confirmed previous results. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17823436/An_18_mo_randomized_trial_of_a_low_glycemic_index_diet_and_weight_change_in_Brazilian_women_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/86.3.707 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -