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The rationale for adopting current international breastfeeding guidelines in South Africa.
Matern Child Nutr 2007; 3(4):271-80MC

Abstract

Current international breastfeeding guidelines recommend exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months, followed by the appropriate and adequate introduction of complementary foods at 6 months, with continued breastfeeding for 2 years and beyond. This guideline is based on evidence to support exclusive and extended breastfeeding as the optimal method of feeding infants and young children. Not only do these breastfeeding practices meet the nutrition needs of infants and children for optimal growth and development, but they also offer a host of other health and socio-economic benefits at all levels of society. The poor breastfeeding rates and increase in infant and child morbidity and mortality in South Africa have led to increased prioritized attention towards the promotion, protection and support of breastfeeding. In 2000, the National Department of Health formally adopted the international breastfeeding guidelines for exclusive and extended breastfeeding practices. Therefore, it remains a priority to implement these guidelines in all current and future breastfeeding programmes and interventions, including the South African paediatric food-based dietary guidelines.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Nutrition and Dietetics, University of Cape Town, South Africa. ailameyer@telkomsa.netNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17824855

Citation

Meyer, Aila, et al. "The Rationale for Adopting Current International Breastfeeding Guidelines in South Africa." Maternal & Child Nutrition, vol. 3, no. 4, 2007, pp. 271-80.
Meyer A, van der Spuy DA, du Plessis LM. The rationale for adopting current international breastfeeding guidelines in South Africa. Matern Child Nutr. 2007;3(4):271-80.
Meyer, A., van der Spuy, D. A., & du Plessis, L. M. (2007). The rationale for adopting current international breastfeeding guidelines in South Africa. Maternal & Child Nutrition, 3(4), pp. 271-80.
Meyer A, van der Spuy DA, du Plessis LM. The Rationale for Adopting Current International Breastfeeding Guidelines in South Africa. Matern Child Nutr. 2007;3(4):271-80. PubMed PMID: 17824855.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The rationale for adopting current international breastfeeding guidelines in South Africa. AU - Meyer,Aila, AU - van der Spuy,Dorothy A, AU - du Plessis,Lisanne M, PY - 2007/9/11/pubmed PY - 2007/12/6/medline PY - 2007/9/11/entrez SP - 271 EP - 80 JF - Maternal & child nutrition JO - Matern Child Nutr VL - 3 IS - 4 N2 - Current international breastfeeding guidelines recommend exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months, followed by the appropriate and adequate introduction of complementary foods at 6 months, with continued breastfeeding for 2 years and beyond. This guideline is based on evidence to support exclusive and extended breastfeeding as the optimal method of feeding infants and young children. Not only do these breastfeeding practices meet the nutrition needs of infants and children for optimal growth and development, but they also offer a host of other health and socio-economic benefits at all levels of society. The poor breastfeeding rates and increase in infant and child morbidity and mortality in South Africa have led to increased prioritized attention towards the promotion, protection and support of breastfeeding. In 2000, the National Department of Health formally adopted the international breastfeeding guidelines for exclusive and extended breastfeeding practices. Therefore, it remains a priority to implement these guidelines in all current and future breastfeeding programmes and interventions, including the South African paediatric food-based dietary guidelines. SN - 1740-8695 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17824855/The_rationale_for_adopting_current_international_breastfeeding_guidelines_in_South_Africa_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1740-8709.2007.00117.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -