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Heavy metal accumulation in wheat plant grown in soil amended with industrial sludge.
Chemosphere 2008; 70(7):1264-72C

Abstract

The concentrations of different forms of Zn, Cu, Mn, Ni, Cd, Cr, Pb and Fe metals were determined for the roadside sludge collected from pickling-rolling and electroplating industrial area. In sludge the relative abundance of total heavy metals were Fe>Mn>Cr>Ni>Cu>Pb>Zn>Cd and DTPA-extractable metals were in the order--Fe>Ni>Mn>Cr>Cu>Zn>Pb>Cd. Pot-culture experiment was conducted in soils amended with sludge (0%, 10%, 20%, 30%), pretreated with lime (0%, 0.5% and 1%). The soils were alkaline in nature (pH>8.3) with organic carbon contents were 0.34% and 0.72%. The most abundant total and bio-available metal was Fe. Two wheat seedlings were grown in each pot containing 3kg sludge-amended or control soil and the experiment was conducted till harvesting. Application of sludge increased both total and bio-available forms of metals in the soils, while lime application decreased the bioavailability of heavy metals in sludge-amended soils. The content of organic carbon showed positive correlation with all metals except Zn, Cr and Pb. CEC also showed a strong positive correlation (R2>0.7) with Fe, Mn, Cu, Ni and Cd. Though wheat plants are not accumulators, the translocation efficiency was appreciably high. The translocation factor from shoot to grain was found smaller than that of root to shoot of wheat plants. This makes an implication that the heavy metal accumulation was proportionally lesser in grain than in shoot. In, 10% sludge with 0.5% lime-amended soils; each of these toxic heavy metals was found to be within permissible range (USEPA). Hence, on the basis of present study, the best possible treatment may be recommended.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Environmental Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110 067, India. sutaparai@gmail.comNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17825356

Citation

Bose, Sutapa, and A K. Bhattacharyya. "Heavy Metal Accumulation in Wheat Plant Grown in Soil Amended With Industrial Sludge." Chemosphere, vol. 70, no. 7, 2008, pp. 1264-72.
Bose S, Bhattacharyya AK. Heavy metal accumulation in wheat plant grown in soil amended with industrial sludge. Chemosphere. 2008;70(7):1264-72.
Bose, S., & Bhattacharyya, A. K. (2008). Heavy metal accumulation in wheat plant grown in soil amended with industrial sludge. Chemosphere, 70(7), pp. 1264-72.
Bose S, Bhattacharyya AK. Heavy Metal Accumulation in Wheat Plant Grown in Soil Amended With Industrial Sludge. Chemosphere. 2008;70(7):1264-72. PubMed PMID: 17825356.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Heavy metal accumulation in wheat plant grown in soil amended with industrial sludge. AU - Bose,Sutapa, AU - Bhattacharyya,A K, Y1 - 2007/09/06/ PY - 2007/04/11/received PY - 2007/06/26/revised PY - 2007/07/25/accepted PY - 2007/9/11/pubmed PY - 2008/4/15/medline PY - 2007/9/11/entrez SP - 1264 EP - 72 JF - Chemosphere JO - Chemosphere VL - 70 IS - 7 N2 - The concentrations of different forms of Zn, Cu, Mn, Ni, Cd, Cr, Pb and Fe metals were determined for the roadside sludge collected from pickling-rolling and electroplating industrial area. In sludge the relative abundance of total heavy metals were Fe>Mn>Cr>Ni>Cu>Pb>Zn>Cd and DTPA-extractable metals were in the order--Fe>Ni>Mn>Cr>Cu>Zn>Pb>Cd. Pot-culture experiment was conducted in soils amended with sludge (0%, 10%, 20%, 30%), pretreated with lime (0%, 0.5% and 1%). The soils were alkaline in nature (pH>8.3) with organic carbon contents were 0.34% and 0.72%. The most abundant total and bio-available metal was Fe. Two wheat seedlings were grown in each pot containing 3kg sludge-amended or control soil and the experiment was conducted till harvesting. Application of sludge increased both total and bio-available forms of metals in the soils, while lime application decreased the bioavailability of heavy metals in sludge-amended soils. The content of organic carbon showed positive correlation with all metals except Zn, Cr and Pb. CEC also showed a strong positive correlation (R2>0.7) with Fe, Mn, Cu, Ni and Cd. Though wheat plants are not accumulators, the translocation efficiency was appreciably high. The translocation factor from shoot to grain was found smaller than that of root to shoot of wheat plants. This makes an implication that the heavy metal accumulation was proportionally lesser in grain than in shoot. In, 10% sludge with 0.5% lime-amended soils; each of these toxic heavy metals was found to be within permissible range (USEPA). Hence, on the basis of present study, the best possible treatment may be recommended. SN - 0045-6535 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17825356/Heavy_metal_accumulation_in_wheat_plant_grown_in_soil_amended_with_industrial_sludge_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0045-6535(07)00951-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -