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The relationship between perceived exertion and physiologic indicators of stress during graded arm exercise in persons with spinal cord injuries.
Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2007; 88(9):1205-11AP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine the relationship between psychologic cues of somatic stress and physiologic responses to exercise in persons with paraplegia and tetraplegia.

DESIGN

Repeated measures with 2 comparison groups.

SETTING

Academic medical center.

PARTICIPANTS

Forty-two subjects between 18 and 69 years of age with motor-complete spinal cord injury (SCI) resulting in paraplegia or tetraplegia (American Spinal Injury Association grades A and B).

INTERVENTIONS

Not applicable.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Subjects underwent peak graded arm ergometry during which heart rate, oxygen consumption (VO2), minute ventilation (VE), and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) (Borg Categorical 6-20 Scale) were measured at successive work rate increments from baseline to fatigue.

RESULTS

There were inconsistent associations among the outcomes. For subjects with tetraplegia, RPE related positively to heart rate at the initial work rate, but there were no other significant correlations. For subjects with paraplegia, RPE did not correlate significantly with heart rate, VO2, or VE. VO2 and Ve related positively at the first and last work rates. In general, heart rate, VO2, and Ve increased as the exercise intensity increased, and were more pronounced in subjects with paraplegia. While RPE values increased with increasing work rates for each group, we found no differences between groups.

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings contradict the well-accepted relationships between RPE and both heart rate and VO2 during exercise by people without disabilities, and challenge the use of RPE as a valid psychophysiologic index of perceived exertion in persons with SCI.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136, and The National Rehabilitation Hospital, Washington, DC, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17826469

Citation

Lewis, John E., et al. "The Relationship Between Perceived Exertion and Physiologic Indicators of Stress During Graded Arm Exercise in Persons With Spinal Cord Injuries." Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, vol. 88, no. 9, 2007, pp. 1205-11.
Lewis JE, Nash MS, Hamm LF, et al. The relationship between perceived exertion and physiologic indicators of stress during graded arm exercise in persons with spinal cord injuries. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2007;88(9):1205-11.
Lewis, J. E., Nash, M. S., Hamm, L. F., Martins, S. C., & Groah, S. L. (2007). The relationship between perceived exertion and physiologic indicators of stress during graded arm exercise in persons with spinal cord injuries. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 88(9), pp. 1205-11.
Lewis JE, et al. The Relationship Between Perceived Exertion and Physiologic Indicators of Stress During Graded Arm Exercise in Persons With Spinal Cord Injuries. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2007;88(9):1205-11. PubMed PMID: 17826469.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The relationship between perceived exertion and physiologic indicators of stress during graded arm exercise in persons with spinal cord injuries. AU - Lewis,John E, AU - Nash,Mark S, AU - Hamm,Larry F, AU - Martins,Shannon C, AU - Groah,Suzanne L, PY - 2007/9/11/pubmed PY - 2007/10/12/medline PY - 2007/9/11/entrez SP - 1205 EP - 11 JF - Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation JO - Arch Phys Med Rehabil VL - 88 IS - 9 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship between psychologic cues of somatic stress and physiologic responses to exercise in persons with paraplegia and tetraplegia. DESIGN: Repeated measures with 2 comparison groups. SETTING: Academic medical center. PARTICIPANTS: Forty-two subjects between 18 and 69 years of age with motor-complete spinal cord injury (SCI) resulting in paraplegia or tetraplegia (American Spinal Injury Association grades A and B). INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Subjects underwent peak graded arm ergometry during which heart rate, oxygen consumption (VO2), minute ventilation (VE), and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) (Borg Categorical 6-20 Scale) were measured at successive work rate increments from baseline to fatigue. RESULTS: There were inconsistent associations among the outcomes. For subjects with tetraplegia, RPE related positively to heart rate at the initial work rate, but there were no other significant correlations. For subjects with paraplegia, RPE did not correlate significantly with heart rate, VO2, or VE. VO2 and Ve related positively at the first and last work rates. In general, heart rate, VO2, and Ve increased as the exercise intensity increased, and were more pronounced in subjects with paraplegia. While RPE values increased with increasing work rates for each group, we found no differences between groups. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings contradict the well-accepted relationships between RPE and both heart rate and VO2 during exercise by people without disabilities, and challenge the use of RPE as a valid psychophysiologic index of perceived exertion in persons with SCI. SN - 0003-9993 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17826469/The_relationship_between_perceived_exertion_and_physiologic_indicators_of_stress_during_graded_arm_exercise_in_persons_with_spinal_cord_injuries_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0003-9993(07)00380-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -