Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Mediterranean diet and Alzheimer disease mortality.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

We previously reported that the Mediterranean diet (MeDi) is related to lower risk for Alzheimer disease (AD). Whether MeDi is associated with subsequent AD course and outcomes has not been investigated.

OBJECTIVES

To examine the association between MeDi and mortality in patients with AD.

METHODS

A total of 192 community-based individuals in New York who were diagnosed with AD were prospectively followed every 1.5 years. Adherence to the MeDi (0- to 9-point scale with higher scores indicating higher adherence) was the main predictor of mortality in Cox models that were adjusted for period of recruitment, age, gender, ethnicity, education, APOE genotype, caloric intake, smoking, and body mass index.

RESULTS

Eighty-five patients with AD (44%) died during the course of 4.4 (+/-3.6, 0.2 to 13.6) years of follow-up. In unadjusted models, higher adherence to MeDi was associated with lower mortality risk (for each additional MeDi point hazard ratio 0.79; 95% CI 0.69 to 0.91; p = 0.001). This result remained significant after controlling for all covariates (0.76; 0.65 to 0.89; p = 0.001). In adjusted models, as compared with AD patients at the lowest MeDi adherence tertile, those at the middle tertile had lower mortality risk (0.65; 0.38 to 1.09; 1.33 years' longer survival), whereas subjects at the highest tertile had an even lower risk (0.27; 0.10 to 0.69; 3.91 years' longer survival; p for trend = 0.003).

CONCLUSION

Adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MeDi) may affect not only risk for Alzheimer disease (AD) but also subsequent disease course: Higher adherence to the MeDi is associated with lower mortality in AD. The gradual reduction in mortality risk for higher MeDi adherence tertiles suggests a possible dose-response effect.

Links

  • PMC Free PDF
  • PMC Free Full Text
  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Taub Institute for Research in Alzheimer's Disease and the Aging Brain, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA. ns257@columbia.edu

    , ,

    Source

    Neurology 69:11 2007 Sep 11 pg 1084-93

    MeSH

    Age Distribution
    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Alzheimer Disease
    Apolipoproteins E
    Body Mass Index
    Brain
    Cohort Studies
    Diet, Mediterranean
    Energy Intake
    Female
    Follow-Up Studies
    Humans
    Male
    New York
    Patient Compliance
    Prospective Studies
    Risk Factors
    Sex Distribution
    Smoking
    Survival Rate

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    17846408

    Citation

    Scarmeas, Nikolaos, et al. "Mediterranean Diet and Alzheimer Disease Mortality." Neurology, vol. 69, no. 11, 2007, pp. 1084-93.
    Scarmeas N, Luchsinger JA, Mayeux R, et al. Mediterranean diet and Alzheimer disease mortality. Neurology. 2007;69(11):1084-93.
    Scarmeas, N., Luchsinger, J. A., Mayeux, R., & Stern, Y. (2007). Mediterranean diet and Alzheimer disease mortality. Neurology, 69(11), pp. 1084-93.
    Scarmeas N, et al. Mediterranean Diet and Alzheimer Disease Mortality. Neurology. 2007 Sep 11;69(11):1084-93. PubMed PMID: 17846408.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Mediterranean diet and Alzheimer disease mortality. AU - Scarmeas,Nikolaos, AU - Luchsinger,Jose A, AU - Mayeux,Richard, AU - Stern,Yaakov, PY - 2007/9/12/pubmed PY - 2007/10/12/medline PY - 2007/9/12/entrez SP - 1084 EP - 93 JF - Neurology JO - Neurology VL - 69 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: We previously reported that the Mediterranean diet (MeDi) is related to lower risk for Alzheimer disease (AD). Whether MeDi is associated with subsequent AD course and outcomes has not been investigated. OBJECTIVES: To examine the association between MeDi and mortality in patients with AD. METHODS: A total of 192 community-based individuals in New York who were diagnosed with AD were prospectively followed every 1.5 years. Adherence to the MeDi (0- to 9-point scale with higher scores indicating higher adherence) was the main predictor of mortality in Cox models that were adjusted for period of recruitment, age, gender, ethnicity, education, APOE genotype, caloric intake, smoking, and body mass index. RESULTS: Eighty-five patients with AD (44%) died during the course of 4.4 (+/-3.6, 0.2 to 13.6) years of follow-up. In unadjusted models, higher adherence to MeDi was associated with lower mortality risk (for each additional MeDi point hazard ratio 0.79; 95% CI 0.69 to 0.91; p = 0.001). This result remained significant after controlling for all covariates (0.76; 0.65 to 0.89; p = 0.001). In adjusted models, as compared with AD patients at the lowest MeDi adherence tertile, those at the middle tertile had lower mortality risk (0.65; 0.38 to 1.09; 1.33 years' longer survival), whereas subjects at the highest tertile had an even lower risk (0.27; 0.10 to 0.69; 3.91 years' longer survival; p for trend = 0.003). CONCLUSION: Adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MeDi) may affect not only risk for Alzheimer disease (AD) but also subsequent disease course: Higher adherence to the MeDi is associated with lower mortality in AD. The gradual reduction in mortality risk for higher MeDi adherence tertiles suggests a possible dose-response effect. SN - 1526-632X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17846408/Mediterranean_diet_and_Alzheimer_disease_mortality_ L2 - http://www.neurology.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=17846408 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -