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Language development and literacy skills in late-talking toddlers with and without familial risk for dyslexia.
Ann Dyslexia. 2005 Dec; 55(2):166-92.AD

Abstract

The relationship between late-talkers' language development and reading and spelling outcomes was examined in children with and without familial risk for dyslexia. The late-talking subgroups were defined using parent- and test-based assessments of receptive and expressive vocabulary and grammar at 2 and 2.5 years as intake criteria. The language skills of late talkers and the remainders of these two groups were assessed at 3.5, 5, and 5.5 years. Reading/spelling outcomes were compared at the end of the second grade. Late-talking toddlers of the at-risk group who had both poor receptive and expressive skills performed less well than all other groups on language measurements at 5.5 years. In contrast, the control group's late talkers with an expressive delay reached the language level of their age-mates already by 3.5 years, and maintained their age-appropriate position two years later. The most significant differences in the reading skills were found between the at-risk children with receptive and expressive delay and the remainder of the controls. Age-appropriate early language skills did not, however, ensure norm-level fluent reading in the at-risk group. The remainder of the at-risk group performed at a significantly lower level than did the remainder of the controls, both on the oral reading and spelling tasks.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Jyväskylä, University of Jyväskylä, Finland. plyytine@psyka.jyu.fiNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17849192

Citation

Lyytinen, Paula, et al. "Language Development and Literacy Skills in Late-talking Toddlers With and Without Familial Risk for Dyslexia." Annals of Dyslexia, vol. 55, no. 2, 2005, pp. 166-92.
Lyytinen P, Eklund K, Lyytinen H. Language development and literacy skills in late-talking toddlers with and without familial risk for dyslexia. Ann Dyslexia. 2005;55(2):166-92.
Lyytinen, P., Eklund, K., & Lyytinen, H. (2005). Language development and literacy skills in late-talking toddlers with and without familial risk for dyslexia. Annals of Dyslexia, 55(2), 166-92.
Lyytinen P, Eklund K, Lyytinen H. Language Development and Literacy Skills in Late-talking Toddlers With and Without Familial Risk for Dyslexia. Ann Dyslexia. 2005;55(2):166-92. PubMed PMID: 17849192.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Language development and literacy skills in late-talking toddlers with and without familial risk for dyslexia. AU - Lyytinen,Paula, AU - Eklund,Kenneth, AU - Lyytinen,Heikki, PY - 2005/08/07/received PY - 2005/10/10/accepted PY - 2007/9/13/pubmed PY - 2007/12/18/medline PY - 2007/9/13/entrez SP - 166 EP - 92 JF - Annals of dyslexia JO - Ann Dyslexia VL - 55 IS - 2 N2 - The relationship between late-talkers' language development and reading and spelling outcomes was examined in children with and without familial risk for dyslexia. The late-talking subgroups were defined using parent- and test-based assessments of receptive and expressive vocabulary and grammar at 2 and 2.5 years as intake criteria. The language skills of late talkers and the remainders of these two groups were assessed at 3.5, 5, and 5.5 years. Reading/spelling outcomes were compared at the end of the second grade. Late-talking toddlers of the at-risk group who had both poor receptive and expressive skills performed less well than all other groups on language measurements at 5.5 years. In contrast, the control group's late talkers with an expressive delay reached the language level of their age-mates already by 3.5 years, and maintained their age-appropriate position two years later. The most significant differences in the reading skills were found between the at-risk children with receptive and expressive delay and the remainder of the controls. Age-appropriate early language skills did not, however, ensure norm-level fluent reading in the at-risk group. The remainder of the at-risk group performed at a significantly lower level than did the remainder of the controls, both on the oral reading and spelling tasks. SN - 1934-7243 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17849192/Language_development_and_literacy_skills_in_late_talking_toddlers_with_and_without_familial_risk_for_dyslexia_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -