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High-intensity strength training improves quality of life in cancer survivors.
Acta Oncol 2007; 46(8):1143-51AO

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Cancer rehabilitation programs mainly involve endurance training, and little attention is paid to strength training. Cancer survivors are generally advised to train at much lower workloads than the standard guidelines for strength training suggest. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of an 18-week high-intensity strength training program in cancer survivors.

METHODS

Fifty-seven patients (age 24 to 73 years) who had received chemotherapy for lymphomas, breast, gynecologic, testicular, or colorectal cancer completed the program. Outcome measures were changes in muscular strength (one-repetition maximum), cardiopulmonary function (VO2 max), maximal short exercise capacity (MSEC), body composition and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) between baseline and follow-up.

DISCUSSION

The high-intensity strength training was well tolerated by all patients. Significant improvements in muscle strength were found, with effect sizes varying from 1.32 to 2.68. VO2 max increased significantly by 10% in men and by 13% in women. Different functional scales of HRQOL improved (p < 0.01), with effect sizes varying from 0.47 to 0.82. Muscle strength correlated significantly with physical functioning before and after the training program.

CONCLUSION

We conclude that a supervised, high-intensity strength training program seems to be an effective means to improve muscle strength, cardiopulmonary function, and HRQOL and should be incorporated in cancer rehabilitation programs. Further randomized trials are needed to confirm the results.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Sports Medicine, Máxima Medisch Centrum, Veldhoven, The Netherlands. II.deBacker@mmc.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17851864

Citation

De Backer, Ingrid C., et al. "High-intensity Strength Training Improves Quality of Life in Cancer Survivors." Acta Oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden), vol. 46, no. 8, 2007, pp. 1143-51.
De Backer IC, Van Breda E, Vreugdenhil A, et al. High-intensity strength training improves quality of life in cancer survivors. Acta Oncol. 2007;46(8):1143-51.
De Backer, I. C., Van Breda, E., Vreugdenhil, A., Nijziel, M. R., Kester, A. D., & Schep, G. (2007). High-intensity strength training improves quality of life in cancer survivors. Acta Oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden), 46(8), pp. 1143-51.
De Backer IC, et al. High-intensity Strength Training Improves Quality of Life in Cancer Survivors. Acta Oncol. 2007;46(8):1143-51. PubMed PMID: 17851864.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - High-intensity strength training improves quality of life in cancer survivors. AU - De Backer,Ingrid C, AU - Van Breda,Eric, AU - Vreugdenhil,Art, AU - Nijziel,Marten R, AU - Kester,Arnold D, AU - Schep,Goof, PY - 2007/9/14/pubmed PY - 2008/4/22/medline PY - 2007/9/14/entrez SP - 1143 EP - 51 JF - Acta oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden) JO - Acta Oncol VL - 46 IS - 8 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Cancer rehabilitation programs mainly involve endurance training, and little attention is paid to strength training. Cancer survivors are generally advised to train at much lower workloads than the standard guidelines for strength training suggest. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of an 18-week high-intensity strength training program in cancer survivors. METHODS: Fifty-seven patients (age 24 to 73 years) who had received chemotherapy for lymphomas, breast, gynecologic, testicular, or colorectal cancer completed the program. Outcome measures were changes in muscular strength (one-repetition maximum), cardiopulmonary function (VO2 max), maximal short exercise capacity (MSEC), body composition and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) between baseline and follow-up. DISCUSSION: The high-intensity strength training was well tolerated by all patients. Significant improvements in muscle strength were found, with effect sizes varying from 1.32 to 2.68. VO2 max increased significantly by 10% in men and by 13% in women. Different functional scales of HRQOL improved (p < 0.01), with effect sizes varying from 0.47 to 0.82. Muscle strength correlated significantly with physical functioning before and after the training program. CONCLUSION: We conclude that a supervised, high-intensity strength training program seems to be an effective means to improve muscle strength, cardiopulmonary function, and HRQOL and should be incorporated in cancer rehabilitation programs. Further randomized trials are needed to confirm the results. SN - 0284-186X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17851864/High_intensity_strength_training_improves_quality_of_life_in_cancer_survivors_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02841860701418838 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -