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US Food assistance programs and trends in children's weight.
Int J Pediatr Obes. 2008; 3(1):22-30.IJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

. High rates of overweight and obesity among low-income children have led some to question whether participation in US domestic food assistance programs contributes to this health problem. We use multiple years of data to examine trends in children's body weight and participation in the Food Stamp Program (FSP) or Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). Specifically, we assess whether a consistent relationship between program participation and body weight exists over time.

METHODS.

Data from multiple waves of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) are used to examine the relationship between children's body weight and food assistance programs between 1976 and 2002. Linear regression models are used to estimate BMI and logit models are used to predict the probabilities of at-risk of overweight and overweight. Food assistance program participants (either FSP or WIC participants depending on age) are compared with income eligible non-participants and higher income children.

RESULTS.

Results show no systematic relationship over time between FSP participation and weight status for school-aged children (age 5-17). For children aged 2-4, no differences in weight status between WIC participants and eligible non-participants were found. However, recent data show some differences between WIC participants and higher income children.

CONCLUSIONS.

Our analysis does not find evidence of a consistent relationship between childhood obesity and participation in the FSP or WIC programs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Economic Research Service -US Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17852543

Citation

Ver Ploeg, Michele, et al. "US Food Assistance Programs and Trends in Children's Weight." International Journal of Pediatric Obesity : IJPO : an Official Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, vol. 3, no. 1, 2008, pp. 22-30.
Ver Ploeg M, Mancino L, Lin BH, et al. US Food assistance programs and trends in children's weight. Int J Pediatr Obes. 2008;3(1):22-30.
Ver Ploeg, M., Mancino, L., Lin, B. H., & Guthrie, J. (2008). US Food assistance programs and trends in children's weight. International Journal of Pediatric Obesity : IJPO : an Official Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, 3(1), 22-30. https://doi.org/10.1080/17477160701520231
Ver Ploeg M, et al. US Food Assistance Programs and Trends in Children's Weight. Int J Pediatr Obes. 2008;3(1):22-30. PubMed PMID: 17852543.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - US Food assistance programs and trends in children's weight. AU - Ver Ploeg,Michele, AU - Mancino,Lisa, AU - Lin,Biing-Hwan, AU - Guthrie,Joanne, PY - 2007/9/14/pubmed PY - 2012/1/17/medline PY - 2007/9/14/entrez SP - 22 EP - 30 JF - International journal of pediatric obesity : IJPO : an official journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity JO - Int J Pediatr Obes VL - 3 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVES. High rates of overweight and obesity among low-income children have led some to question whether participation in US domestic food assistance programs contributes to this health problem. We use multiple years of data to examine trends in children's body weight and participation in the Food Stamp Program (FSP) or Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). Specifically, we assess whether a consistent relationship between program participation and body weight exists over time. METHODS. Data from multiple waves of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) are used to examine the relationship between children's body weight and food assistance programs between 1976 and 2002. Linear regression models are used to estimate BMI and logit models are used to predict the probabilities of at-risk of overweight and overweight. Food assistance program participants (either FSP or WIC participants depending on age) are compared with income eligible non-participants and higher income children. RESULTS. Results show no systematic relationship over time between FSP participation and weight status for school-aged children (age 5-17). For children aged 2-4, no differences in weight status between WIC participants and eligible non-participants were found. However, recent data show some differences between WIC participants and higher income children. CONCLUSIONS. Our analysis does not find evidence of a consistent relationship between childhood obesity and participation in the FSP or WIC programs. SN - 1747-7174 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17852543/US_Food_assistance_programs_and_trends_in_children's_weight_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1080/17477160701520231 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -