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Alcohol consumption and cardiovascular mortality accounting for possible misclassification of intake: 11-year follow-up of the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study.

Abstract

AIMS

To investigate the relationship between usual daily alcohol intake, beverage type and drinking frequency on cardiovascular (CVD) and coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality, accounting for systematic misclassification of intake.

DESIGN

Prospective cohort study with mean follow-up of 11.4 years. Setting The Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study, Australia.

PARTICIPANTS

A total of 38 200 volunteers (23 044 women) aged 40-69 years at baseline (1990-1994).

MEASUREMENTS

Self-reported alcohol intake using beverage-specific quantity-frequency questions (usual intake) and drinking diary for previous week.

FINDINGS

Compared with life-time abstention, usual daily alcohol intake was associated with lower CVD and CHD mortality risk for women but not men. For women, the hazard ratio [HR (95% CI)] for CVD for those drinking > 20 g/day alcohol was 0.43 (0.19-0.95; P trend = 0.18), and for CHD, 0.19 (0.05-0.82; P trend = 0.24). Male former drinkers had over twice the mortality risk for CVD [HR = 2.58 (1.51-4.41)] and CHD [HR = 2.91 (1.59-5.33)]. Wine was the only beverage associated inversely with mortality for women. Compared with drinkers who consumed no alcohol in the week before baseline, drinking frequency was associated inversely with CVD and CHD mortality risk for men but not women. HR for men drinking 6-7 days/week was 0.49 (0.29-0.81; P trend = 0.02) for CVD, and 0.49 (0.26-0.92: P trend = 0.23) for CHD.

CONCLUSIONS

Usual daily alcohol intake was associated with reduced CVD and CHD mortality for women but not men. This benefit appeared to be mainly from wine, although comparison of beverages was not possible. Drinking frequency was associated inversely with CVD and CHD death for men but not women.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. linton.harriss@med.monash.edu.au

    , , , , , ,

    Source

    Addiction (Abingdon, England) 102:10 2007 Oct pg 1574-85

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Alcohol Drinking
    Alcoholic Beverages
    Australia
    Cardiovascular Diseases
    Cohort Studies
    Coronary Disease
    Disclosure
    Female
    Follow-Up Studies
    Humans
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Prospective Studies
    Risk Assessment
    Sex Factors
    Wine

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    17854334

    Citation

    Harriss, Linton R., et al. "Alcohol Consumption and Cardiovascular Mortality Accounting for Possible Misclassification of Intake: 11-year Follow-up of the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study." Addiction (Abingdon, England), vol. 102, no. 10, 2007, pp. 1574-85.
    Harriss LR, English DR, Hopper JL, et al. Alcohol consumption and cardiovascular mortality accounting for possible misclassification of intake: 11-year follow-up of the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. Addiction. 2007;102(10):1574-85.
    Harriss, L. R., English, D. R., Hopper, J. L., Powles, J., Simpson, J. A., O'Dea, K., ... Tonkin, A. M. (2007). Alcohol consumption and cardiovascular mortality accounting for possible misclassification of intake: 11-year follow-up of the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. Addiction (Abingdon, England), 102(10), pp. 1574-85.
    Harriss LR, et al. Alcohol Consumption and Cardiovascular Mortality Accounting for Possible Misclassification of Intake: 11-year Follow-up of the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. Addiction. 2007;102(10):1574-85. PubMed PMID: 17854334.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Alcohol consumption and cardiovascular mortality accounting for possible misclassification of intake: 11-year follow-up of the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. AU - Harriss,Linton R, AU - English,Dallas R, AU - Hopper,John L, AU - Powles,John, AU - Simpson,Julie A, AU - O'Dea,Kerin, AU - Giles,Graham G, AU - Tonkin,Andrew M, PY - 2007/9/15/pubmed PY - 2007/12/13/medline PY - 2007/9/15/entrez SP - 1574 EP - 85 JF - Addiction (Abingdon, England) JO - Addiction VL - 102 IS - 10 N2 - AIMS: To investigate the relationship between usual daily alcohol intake, beverage type and drinking frequency on cardiovascular (CVD) and coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality, accounting for systematic misclassification of intake. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study with mean follow-up of 11.4 years. Setting The Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study, Australia. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 38 200 volunteers (23 044 women) aged 40-69 years at baseline (1990-1994). MEASUREMENTS: Self-reported alcohol intake using beverage-specific quantity-frequency questions (usual intake) and drinking diary for previous week. FINDINGS: Compared with life-time abstention, usual daily alcohol intake was associated with lower CVD and CHD mortality risk for women but not men. For women, the hazard ratio [HR (95% CI)] for CVD for those drinking > 20 g/day alcohol was 0.43 (0.19-0.95; P trend = 0.18), and for CHD, 0.19 (0.05-0.82; P trend = 0.24). Male former drinkers had over twice the mortality risk for CVD [HR = 2.58 (1.51-4.41)] and CHD [HR = 2.91 (1.59-5.33)]. Wine was the only beverage associated inversely with mortality for women. Compared with drinkers who consumed no alcohol in the week before baseline, drinking frequency was associated inversely with CVD and CHD mortality risk for men but not women. HR for men drinking 6-7 days/week was 0.49 (0.29-0.81; P trend = 0.02) for CVD, and 0.49 (0.26-0.92: P trend = 0.23) for CHD. CONCLUSIONS: Usual daily alcohol intake was associated with reduced CVD and CHD mortality for women but not men. This benefit appeared to be mainly from wine, although comparison of beverages was not possible. Drinking frequency was associated inversely with CVD and CHD death for men but not women. SN - 0965-2140 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17854334/Alcohol_consumption_and_cardiovascular_mortality_accounting_for_possible_misclassification_of_intake:_11_year_follow_up_of_the_Melbourne_Collaborative_Cohort_Study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1360-0443.2007.01947.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -