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Pharmacological evidence for the involvement of the opioid system in the antidepressant-like effect of adenosine in the mouse forced swimming test.
Eur J Pharmacol. 2007 Dec 08; 576(1-3):91-8.EJ

Abstract

This study investigated the involvement of the opioid system in the antidepressant-like effect of adenosine in the forced swimming test. The effect of adenosine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) was prevented by the pretreatment of mice with naloxone (1 mg/kg, i.p., a nonselective opioid receptor antagonist), naltrindole (3 mg/kg, i.p., a selective delta-opioid receptor antagonist), clocinnamox (1 mg/kg, i.p., an irreversible mu-opioid receptor antagonist), and 2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-Nmethyl-N-[(1S)-1-(3-isothiocyanatophenyl)-2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)ethyl]acetamide (DIPPA; 1 mg/kg, i.p., a selective kappa-opioid receptor antagonist), but not with naloxone methiodide (1 mg/kg, s.c., a nonselective opioid receptor antagonist that does not cross the blood-brain barrier). Naloxone also prevented the anti-immobility effect of cyclohexyladenosine (CHA, 0.1 mg/kg, i.p., a selective adenosine A(1) receptor agonist) and N6-[2-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-2-(2-methylphenyl)ethyl]adenosine (DPMA, 1 mg/kg, i.p., a selective adenosine A(2A) receptor agonist). The administration of DIPPA (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) or morphine (1 mg/kg, s.c., a nonselective opioid receptor agonist), but not naltrindole (0.3 mg/kg, i.p.) and clocinnamox (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) potentiated the effect of a subeffective dose of adenosine (1 mg/kg, i.p.) in the forced swimming test, without affecting the locomotor activity. No additive effect in the immobility time was observed when mice were treated with morphine (5 mg/kg, s.c.) plus adenosine (10 mg/kg, i.p.). These results indicate that the anti-immobility effect of adenosine in the forced swimming test, via adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors, is mediated by an interaction with the opioid system, likely dependent on an activation of mu- and delta-opioid receptors and an inhibition of kappa-opioid receptors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departamento de Bioquímica, Centro de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário - Trindade-88040-900, Florianópolis-SC, Brazil.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17868670

Citation

Kaster, Manuella P., et al. "Pharmacological Evidence for the Involvement of the Opioid System in the Antidepressant-like Effect of Adenosine in the Mouse Forced Swimming Test." European Journal of Pharmacology, vol. 576, no. 1-3, 2007, pp. 91-8.
Kaster MP, Budni J, Santos AR, et al. Pharmacological evidence for the involvement of the opioid system in the antidepressant-like effect of adenosine in the mouse forced swimming test. Eur J Pharmacol. 2007;576(1-3):91-8.
Kaster, M. P., Budni, J., Santos, A. R., & Rodrigues, A. L. (2007). Pharmacological evidence for the involvement of the opioid system in the antidepressant-like effect of adenosine in the mouse forced swimming test. European Journal of Pharmacology, 576(1-3), 91-8.
Kaster MP, et al. Pharmacological Evidence for the Involvement of the Opioid System in the Antidepressant-like Effect of Adenosine in the Mouse Forced Swimming Test. Eur J Pharmacol. 2007 Dec 8;576(1-3):91-8. PubMed PMID: 17868670.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pharmacological evidence for the involvement of the opioid system in the antidepressant-like effect of adenosine in the mouse forced swimming test. AU - Kaster,Manuella P, AU - Budni,Josiane, AU - Santos,Adair R S, AU - Rodrigues,Ana Lúcia S, Y1 - 2007/08/25/ PY - 2007/01/17/received PY - 2007/07/30/revised PY - 2007/08/20/accepted PY - 2007/9/18/pubmed PY - 2008/3/7/medline PY - 2007/9/18/entrez SP - 91 EP - 8 JF - European journal of pharmacology JO - Eur J Pharmacol VL - 576 IS - 1-3 N2 - This study investigated the involvement of the opioid system in the antidepressant-like effect of adenosine in the forced swimming test. The effect of adenosine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) was prevented by the pretreatment of mice with naloxone (1 mg/kg, i.p., a nonselective opioid receptor antagonist), naltrindole (3 mg/kg, i.p., a selective delta-opioid receptor antagonist), clocinnamox (1 mg/kg, i.p., an irreversible mu-opioid receptor antagonist), and 2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-Nmethyl-N-[(1S)-1-(3-isothiocyanatophenyl)-2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)ethyl]acetamide (DIPPA; 1 mg/kg, i.p., a selective kappa-opioid receptor antagonist), but not with naloxone methiodide (1 mg/kg, s.c., a nonselective opioid receptor antagonist that does not cross the blood-brain barrier). Naloxone also prevented the anti-immobility effect of cyclohexyladenosine (CHA, 0.1 mg/kg, i.p., a selective adenosine A(1) receptor agonist) and N6-[2-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-2-(2-methylphenyl)ethyl]adenosine (DPMA, 1 mg/kg, i.p., a selective adenosine A(2A) receptor agonist). The administration of DIPPA (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) or morphine (1 mg/kg, s.c., a nonselective opioid receptor agonist), but not naltrindole (0.3 mg/kg, i.p.) and clocinnamox (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) potentiated the effect of a subeffective dose of adenosine (1 mg/kg, i.p.) in the forced swimming test, without affecting the locomotor activity. No additive effect in the immobility time was observed when mice were treated with morphine (5 mg/kg, s.c.) plus adenosine (10 mg/kg, i.p.). These results indicate that the anti-immobility effect of adenosine in the forced swimming test, via adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors, is mediated by an interaction with the opioid system, likely dependent on an activation of mu- and delta-opioid receptors and an inhibition of kappa-opioid receptors. SN - 0014-2999 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17868670/Pharmacological_evidence_for_the_involvement_of_the_opioid_system_in_the_antidepressant_like_effect_of_adenosine_in_the_mouse_forced_swimming_test_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0014-2999(07)00938-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -