Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The effects of skin-to-skin contact during acute pain in preterm newborns.
Eur J Pain. 2008 May; 12(4):464-71.EJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE

Several promising non-pharmacological interventions have been developed to reduce acute pain in preterm infants including skin-to-skin contact between a mother and her infant. However, variability in physiological outcomes of existing studies on skin-to-skin makes it difficult to determine treatment effects of this naturalistic approach for the preterm infant. The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of mother and infant skin-to-skin contact during heel prick in premature infants.

METHOD

Fifty nine stable preterm infants (born at least 30 weeks gestational age) who were undergoing routine heel lance were randomly assigned to either 15 min of skin-to-skin contact before, during and following heel prick (n=31, treatment group), or to regular care (n=28, control group). Throughout the heel lance procedure, all infants were assessed for change in facial action (NFCS), behavioral state, crying, and heart rate.

RESULTS

Statistically significant differences were noted between the treatment and control groups during the puncture, heel squeeze and the post phases of heel prick. Infants who received skin-to-skin contact were more likely to show lower NFCS scores throughout the procedure. Both groups of infants cried and showed increased heart rate during puncture and heel squeeze although changes in these measures were less for the treated infants.

CONCLUSIONS

Skin-to-skin contact promoted reduction in behavioral measures and less physiological increase during procedure. It is recommended that skin-to-skin contact be used as a non-pharmacologic intervention to relieve acute pain in stable premature infants born 30 weeks gestational age or older.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Sao Paulo at Ribeirao Preto College of Nursing, WHO Collaborating Centre for Nursing Research Development, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, Ribeirao Preto-SP, CEP: 14040-902, Brazil. thailacastral@usp.brNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17869557

Citation

Castral, Thaila C., et al. "The Effects of Skin-to-skin Contact During Acute Pain in Preterm Newborns." European Journal of Pain (London, England), vol. 12, no. 4, 2008, pp. 464-71.
Castral TC, Warnock F, Leite AM, et al. The effects of skin-to-skin contact during acute pain in preterm newborns. Eur J Pain. 2008;12(4):464-71.
Castral, T. C., Warnock, F., Leite, A. M., Haas, V. J., & Scochi, C. G. (2008). The effects of skin-to-skin contact during acute pain in preterm newborns. European Journal of Pain (London, England), 12(4), 464-71.
Castral TC, et al. The Effects of Skin-to-skin Contact During Acute Pain in Preterm Newborns. Eur J Pain. 2008;12(4):464-71. PubMed PMID: 17869557.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The effects of skin-to-skin contact during acute pain in preterm newborns. AU - Castral,Thaila C, AU - Warnock,Fay, AU - Leite,Adriana M, AU - Haas,Vanderlei J, AU - Scochi,Carmen G S, Y1 - 2007/09/14/ PY - 2007/01/23/received PY - 2007/07/12/revised PY - 2007/07/27/accepted PY - 2007/9/18/pubmed PY - 2008/4/9/medline PY - 2007/9/18/entrez SP - 464 EP - 71 JF - European journal of pain (London, England) JO - Eur J Pain VL - 12 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Several promising non-pharmacological interventions have been developed to reduce acute pain in preterm infants including skin-to-skin contact between a mother and her infant. However, variability in physiological outcomes of existing studies on skin-to-skin makes it difficult to determine treatment effects of this naturalistic approach for the preterm infant. The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of mother and infant skin-to-skin contact during heel prick in premature infants. METHOD: Fifty nine stable preterm infants (born at least 30 weeks gestational age) who were undergoing routine heel lance were randomly assigned to either 15 min of skin-to-skin contact before, during and following heel prick (n=31, treatment group), or to regular care (n=28, control group). Throughout the heel lance procedure, all infants were assessed for change in facial action (NFCS), behavioral state, crying, and heart rate. RESULTS: Statistically significant differences were noted between the treatment and control groups during the puncture, heel squeeze and the post phases of heel prick. Infants who received skin-to-skin contact were more likely to show lower NFCS scores throughout the procedure. Both groups of infants cried and showed increased heart rate during puncture and heel squeeze although changes in these measures were less for the treated infants. CONCLUSIONS: Skin-to-skin contact promoted reduction in behavioral measures and less physiological increase during procedure. It is recommended that skin-to-skin contact be used as a non-pharmacologic intervention to relieve acute pain in stable premature infants born 30 weeks gestational age or older. SN - 1532-2149 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17869557/The_effects_of_skin_to_skin_contact_during_acute_pain_in_preterm_newborns_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1090-3801(07)00614-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -