Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The assessment and management of tinea capitis in children.
Pediatr Emerg Care. 2007 Sep; 23(9):662-5; quiz 666-8.PE

Abstract

Tinea capitis is an infection of the scalp and hair shaft caused by dermatophyte fungi. It is seen in all age groups, and the incidence seems to be on the rise in North America. Clinical diagnosis of tinea capitis can be challenging, as symptoms can vary from minimal pruritus with no hair loss, to severe tenderness, purulence, and permanent scarring in inflammatory kerion lesions. The diagnosis of tinea capitis must be confirmed in the laboratory by using fungal stains or obtaining cultures, since treatment may be prolonged with potential side effects. Systemic therapy is needed because topical antifungals cannot effectively penetrate the hair shaft to eradicate the infection. Oral griseofulvin remains the standard treatment agent, but terbinafine and itraconazole are also effective alternatives (although currently without Food and Drug Administration approval).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Stollery Children's Hospital, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. drsaminaali@yahoo.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17876261

Citation

Ali, Samina, et al. "The Assessment and Management of Tinea Capitis in Children." Pediatric Emergency Care, vol. 23, no. 9, 2007, pp. 662-5; quiz 666-8.
Ali S, Graham TA, Forgie SE. The assessment and management of tinea capitis in children. Pediatr Emerg Care. 2007;23(9):662-5; quiz 666-8.
Ali, S., Graham, T. A., & Forgie, S. E. (2007). The assessment and management of tinea capitis in children. Pediatric Emergency Care, 23(9), 662-5; quiz 666-8.
Ali S, Graham TA, Forgie SE. The Assessment and Management of Tinea Capitis in Children. Pediatr Emerg Care. 2007;23(9):662-5; quiz 666-8. PubMed PMID: 17876261.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The assessment and management of tinea capitis in children. AU - Ali,Samina, AU - Graham,Timothy A D, AU - Forgie,Sarah E D, PY - 2007/9/19/pubmed PY - 2007/10/19/medline PY - 2007/9/19/entrez SP - 662-5; quiz 666-8 JF - Pediatric emergency care JO - Pediatr Emerg Care VL - 23 IS - 9 N2 - Tinea capitis is an infection of the scalp and hair shaft caused by dermatophyte fungi. It is seen in all age groups, and the incidence seems to be on the rise in North America. Clinical diagnosis of tinea capitis can be challenging, as symptoms can vary from minimal pruritus with no hair loss, to severe tenderness, purulence, and permanent scarring in inflammatory kerion lesions. The diagnosis of tinea capitis must be confirmed in the laboratory by using fungal stains or obtaining cultures, since treatment may be prolonged with potential side effects. Systemic therapy is needed because topical antifungals cannot effectively penetrate the hair shaft to eradicate the infection. Oral griseofulvin remains the standard treatment agent, but terbinafine and itraconazole are also effective alternatives (although currently without Food and Drug Administration approval). SN - 1535-1815 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17876261/The_assessment_and_management_of_tinea_capitis_in_children_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEC.0b013e31814efe06 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -