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Skin prick test can identify eczematous infants at risk of asthma and allergic rhinitis.
Clin Exp Allergy. 2007 Nov; 37(11):1624-31.CE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Assessment of allergic sensitization is not routinely performed in infants and young children with eczema.

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether infants who have atopic eczema (with sensitization) are at a greater risk of developing asthma and allergic rhinitis (AR) than those with non-atopic eczema (without concurrent sensitization).

METHODS

The presence of eczema was prospectively documented until 2 years of age in a birth cohort of 620 infants with a family history of atopic disease. Sensitization status was determined by skin prick tests (SPTs) at 6, 12, and 24 months using six common allergens. Interviews were conducted at 6 and 7 years to determine the presence of asthma and AR.

RESULTS

Within the first 2 years of life, 28.7% of the 443 children who could be classified had atopic eczema: 20.5% had non-atopic eczema, 19.0% were asymptomatic but sensitized and 31.8% were asymptomatic and not sensitized. When compared with children with non-atopic eczema in the first 2 years of life, children with atopic eczema had a substantially greater risk of asthma [odds ratio (OR)=3.52, 95% confidence interval=1.88-6.59] and AR (OR=2.91, 1.48-5.71). The increased risk of asthma was even greater if the infant had a large SPT (OR=4.61, 2.34-9.09) indicative of food allergy. There was no strong evidence that children with non-atopic eczema had an increased risk of asthma or AR compared with asymptomatic children.

CONCLUSION

In children with eczema within the first 2 years of life, SPT can provide valuable information on the risk of childhood asthma and AR.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Molecular, Environmental, Genetic and Analytic Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry & Health Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. lowe.adrian@gmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17877754

Citation

Lowe, A J., et al. "Skin Prick Test Can Identify Eczematous Infants at Risk of Asthma and Allergic Rhinitis." Clinical and Experimental Allergy : Journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 37, no. 11, 2007, pp. 1624-31.
Lowe AJ, Hosking CS, Bennett CM, et al. Skin prick test can identify eczematous infants at risk of asthma and allergic rhinitis. Clin Exp Allergy. 2007;37(11):1624-31.
Lowe, A. J., Hosking, C. S., Bennett, C. M., Carlin, J. B., Abramson, M. J., Hill, D. J., & Dharmage, S. C. (2007). Skin prick test can identify eczematous infants at risk of asthma and allergic rhinitis. Clinical and Experimental Allergy : Journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 37(11), 1624-31.
Lowe AJ, et al. Skin Prick Test Can Identify Eczematous Infants at Risk of Asthma and Allergic Rhinitis. Clin Exp Allergy. 2007;37(11):1624-31. PubMed PMID: 17877754.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Skin prick test can identify eczematous infants at risk of asthma and allergic rhinitis. AU - Lowe,A J, AU - Hosking,C S, AU - Bennett,C M, AU - Carlin,J B, AU - Abramson,M J, AU - Hill,D J, AU - Dharmage,S C, Y1 - 2007/09/17/ PY - 2007/9/20/pubmed PY - 2008/1/16/medline PY - 2007/9/20/entrez SP - 1624 EP - 31 JF - Clinical and experimental allergy : journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology JO - Clin Exp Allergy VL - 37 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: Assessment of allergic sensitization is not routinely performed in infants and young children with eczema. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether infants who have atopic eczema (with sensitization) are at a greater risk of developing asthma and allergic rhinitis (AR) than those with non-atopic eczema (without concurrent sensitization). METHODS: The presence of eczema was prospectively documented until 2 years of age in a birth cohort of 620 infants with a family history of atopic disease. Sensitization status was determined by skin prick tests (SPTs) at 6, 12, and 24 months using six common allergens. Interviews were conducted at 6 and 7 years to determine the presence of asthma and AR. RESULTS: Within the first 2 years of life, 28.7% of the 443 children who could be classified had atopic eczema: 20.5% had non-atopic eczema, 19.0% were asymptomatic but sensitized and 31.8% were asymptomatic and not sensitized. When compared with children with non-atopic eczema in the first 2 years of life, children with atopic eczema had a substantially greater risk of asthma [odds ratio (OR)=3.52, 95% confidence interval=1.88-6.59] and AR (OR=2.91, 1.48-5.71). The increased risk of asthma was even greater if the infant had a large SPT (OR=4.61, 2.34-9.09) indicative of food allergy. There was no strong evidence that children with non-atopic eczema had an increased risk of asthma or AR compared with asymptomatic children. CONCLUSION: In children with eczema within the first 2 years of life, SPT can provide valuable information on the risk of childhood asthma and AR. SN - 0954-7894 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17877754/Skin_prick_test_can_identify_eczematous_infants_at_risk_of_asthma_and_allergic_rhinitis_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2222.2007.02822.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -