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State-specific influenza vaccination coverage among adults aged > or =18 years--United States, 2003-04 and 2005-06 influenza seasons.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2007 Sep 21; 56(37):953-9.MM

Abstract

Influenza epidemics occur seasonally and result in substantial morbidity and mortality among adults in the United States. Adult groups included in the 2007 Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommendation for annual influenza vaccination are persons aged 18-49 years with high-risk conditions (i.e., conditions associated with an increased risk for complications from influenza), persons aged > or =50 years, health-care personnel, and others who are household contacts or caregivers of persons at high risk (e.g., persons with high-risk conditions or children aged < or =59 months). In addition, adults who want to reduce the risk for becoming ill with influenza or of transmitting influenza to others should be vaccinated. Healthy People 2010 (HP2010) objectives include increasing vaccination levels to 90% for adults aged > or =65 years (objective 14-29a) and 60% for persons aged 18-64 years who have one or more high-risk conditions (objective 14-29c). From the 1992-93 through 2003-04 influenza seasons, seasonal influenza vaccination coverage estimates (based on Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System [BRFSS] data) among adults aged > or =65 years trended upward, except for three seasons (1997-98, 1999-00, and 2000-01) when no increases occurred (Figure). To evaluate recent state-specific progress toward the HP2010 objectives, CDC compared data from the 2004 and 2006 BRFSS surveys, which reflected vaccinations received during the 2003-04 and 2005-06 influenza seasons; data from the 2004-05 influenza season, which have been published previously, were not included in this comparison because that season was marked by a substantial shortage of influenza vaccine. This report describes the results of the analysis, which indicated that influenza vaccination coverage for the 2005-06 season did not return to levels observed before the vaccine shortage of 2004-05 and remained substantially below HP2010 targets. Comprehensive measures are needed to improve influenza vaccination coverage among adult populations in the United States, including increasing adoption of recommended adult immunization practices by health-care providers, raising public awareness about influenza vaccination, vaccinating throughout the influenza season, and ensuring stable supplies of readily available vaccine.

Authors

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17882124

Citation

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). "State-specific Influenza Vaccination Coverage Among Adults Aged > or =18 years--United States, 2003-04 and 2005-06 Influenza Seasons." MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 56, no. 37, 2007, pp. 953-9.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). State-specific influenza vaccination coverage among adults aged > or =18 years--United States, 2003-04 and 2005-06 influenza seasons. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2007;56(37):953-9.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (2007). State-specific influenza vaccination coverage among adults aged > or =18 years--United States, 2003-04 and 2005-06 influenza seasons. MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 56(37), 953-9.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). State-specific Influenza Vaccination Coverage Among Adults Aged > or =18 years--United States, 2003-04 and 2005-06 Influenza Seasons. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2007 Sep 21;56(37):953-9. PubMed PMID: 17882124.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - State-specific influenza vaccination coverage among adults aged > or =18 years--United States, 2003-04 and 2005-06 influenza seasons. A1 - ,, PY - 2007/9/21/pubmed PY - 2007/9/22/medline PY - 2007/9/21/entrez SP - 953 EP - 9 JF - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report JO - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep VL - 56 IS - 37 N2 - Influenza epidemics occur seasonally and result in substantial morbidity and mortality among adults in the United States. Adult groups included in the 2007 Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommendation for annual influenza vaccination are persons aged 18-49 years with high-risk conditions (i.e., conditions associated with an increased risk for complications from influenza), persons aged > or =50 years, health-care personnel, and others who are household contacts or caregivers of persons at high risk (e.g., persons with high-risk conditions or children aged < or =59 months). In addition, adults who want to reduce the risk for becoming ill with influenza or of transmitting influenza to others should be vaccinated. Healthy People 2010 (HP2010) objectives include increasing vaccination levels to 90% for adults aged > or =65 years (objective 14-29a) and 60% for persons aged 18-64 years who have one or more high-risk conditions (objective 14-29c). From the 1992-93 through 2003-04 influenza seasons, seasonal influenza vaccination coverage estimates (based on Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System [BRFSS] data) among adults aged > or =65 years trended upward, except for three seasons (1997-98, 1999-00, and 2000-01) when no increases occurred (Figure). To evaluate recent state-specific progress toward the HP2010 objectives, CDC compared data from the 2004 and 2006 BRFSS surveys, which reflected vaccinations received during the 2003-04 and 2005-06 influenza seasons; data from the 2004-05 influenza season, which have been published previously, were not included in this comparison because that season was marked by a substantial shortage of influenza vaccine. This report describes the results of the analysis, which indicated that influenza vaccination coverage for the 2005-06 season did not return to levels observed before the vaccine shortage of 2004-05 and remained substantially below HP2010 targets. Comprehensive measures are needed to improve influenza vaccination coverage among adult populations in the United States, including increasing adoption of recommended adult immunization practices by health-care providers, raising public awareness about influenza vaccination, vaccinating throughout the influenza season, and ensuring stable supplies of readily available vaccine. SN - 1545-861X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17882124/State_specific_influenza_vaccination_coverage_among_adults_aged_>_or_=18_years__United_States_2003_04_and_2005_06_influenza_seasons_ L2 - https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5637a1.htm DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -