Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Cancer incidence and mortality in the Caribbean.
Cancer Invest 2007; 25(6):476-83CI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Nearly 10% of immigrants to the United States come from the Caribbean region. In this paper, we analyzed incidence and mortality rates of the major cancers in the Bahamas, Barbados, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, and Trinidad and Tobago, and compared them with US patterns.

METHODS

We obtained age-standardized, sex-specific cancer incidence and mortality rates for cancers of the bladder, breast, cervix, esophagus, large bowel, liver, lung, pancreas, prostate, and stomach for 8 Caribbean countries and the United States from the GLOBOCAN program of the International Agency for Research in Cancer (IARC) and for the U.S. population from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program of the NCI.

RESULTS

GLOBOCAN incidence and mortality rates for the overall United States were lower than but correlated with overall SEER rates. Based on GLOBOCAN data, the incidence and mortality rates of cancers of the breast, prostate, large bowel, and lung, and, among males, bladder cancer were lower in the Caribbean countries than the United States. Caribbean countries had higher rates of cancers of the cervix, esophagus, liver, and stomach. Haiti had the highest incidence and mortality rates of cervix and liver cancers. Jamaica and Haiti had the highest rates of stomach cancer.

CONCLUSIONS

Cancer incidence and mortality in the Caribbean generally follow known patterns of association with economic development, infectious agents, and racial/ethnic origin. Studying these patterns and how immigration changes them may yield clues to cancer etiology. A better understanding of cancer incidence and mortality rates may help health policymakers to implement state-of-the-art treatment and preventive services for people of Caribbean descent both in their native countries and in immigrant communities in the United States.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17882661

Citation

Phillips, Adrienne A., et al. "Cancer Incidence and Mortality in the Caribbean." Cancer Investigation, vol. 25, no. 6, 2007, pp. 476-83.
Phillips AA, Jacobson JS, Magai C, et al. Cancer incidence and mortality in the Caribbean. Cancer Invest. 2007;25(6):476-83.
Phillips, A. A., Jacobson, J. S., Magai, C., Consedine, N., Horowicz-Mehler, N. C., & Neugut, A. I. (2007). Cancer incidence and mortality in the Caribbean. Cancer Investigation, 25(6), pp. 476-83.
Phillips AA, et al. Cancer Incidence and Mortality in the Caribbean. Cancer Invest. 2007;25(6):476-83. PubMed PMID: 17882661.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cancer incidence and mortality in the Caribbean. AU - Phillips,Adrienne A, AU - Jacobson,Judith S, AU - Magai,Carol, AU - Consedine,Nathan, AU - Horowicz-Mehler,Nathalie C, AU - Neugut,Alfred I, PY - 2007/9/21/pubmed PY - 2007/11/14/medline PY - 2007/9/21/entrez SP - 476 EP - 83 JF - Cancer investigation JO - Cancer Invest. VL - 25 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Nearly 10% of immigrants to the United States come from the Caribbean region. In this paper, we analyzed incidence and mortality rates of the major cancers in the Bahamas, Barbados, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, and Trinidad and Tobago, and compared them with US patterns. METHODS: We obtained age-standardized, sex-specific cancer incidence and mortality rates for cancers of the bladder, breast, cervix, esophagus, large bowel, liver, lung, pancreas, prostate, and stomach for 8 Caribbean countries and the United States from the GLOBOCAN program of the International Agency for Research in Cancer (IARC) and for the U.S. population from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program of the NCI. RESULTS: GLOBOCAN incidence and mortality rates for the overall United States were lower than but correlated with overall SEER rates. Based on GLOBOCAN data, the incidence and mortality rates of cancers of the breast, prostate, large bowel, and lung, and, among males, bladder cancer were lower in the Caribbean countries than the United States. Caribbean countries had higher rates of cancers of the cervix, esophagus, liver, and stomach. Haiti had the highest incidence and mortality rates of cervix and liver cancers. Jamaica and Haiti had the highest rates of stomach cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Cancer incidence and mortality in the Caribbean generally follow known patterns of association with economic development, infectious agents, and racial/ethnic origin. Studying these patterns and how immigration changes them may yield clues to cancer etiology. A better understanding of cancer incidence and mortality rates may help health policymakers to implement state-of-the-art treatment and preventive services for people of Caribbean descent both in their native countries and in immigrant communities in the United States. SN - 0735-7907 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17882661/Cancer_incidence_and_mortality_in_the_Caribbean_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07357900701359841 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -