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Autologous injectable tissue-engineered cartilage by using platelet-rich plasma: experimental study in a rabbit model.

Abstract

PURPOSE

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been widely applied to promote tissue healing and used as a novel injectable scaffold in bone tissue engineering. However, there is no report about its feasibility to support chondrogenesis. This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of a PRP carrier to deliver chondrocytes and regenerate cartilage tissues in a rabbit model via injection.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Eight New Zealand rabbits were divided into a chondrocytes/PRP group (n = 4) and a PRP-alone group (n = 4). Chondrocytes harvested from the auricular root of New Zealand rabbits were cultured and harvested. The chondrocytes were then mixed with PRP solution to generate chondrocytes/PRP composites with final cellular density of 5.0 x 10(7)/mL. Bovine thrombin was used as a cross-linking agent to gel chondrocytes/PRP composites, then, the composites were injected subcutaneously into the dorsal tissue of cell donor animals. As controls, PRP alone was injected into another 4 rabbits. At the second month after injection, rabbits were prepared for magnetic resonance imaging. The samples were then harvested for macroscopical examination, histological analysis, and glycosaminoglycan quantification.

RESULTS

Two months after injection, the hard knobbles were easily palpated under the dorsal skin of the animals in the chondrocytes/PRP group, and magnetic resonance images showed the presence of cartilage-like tissues. In histological analysis, formation of new cartilage was observed in the chondrocytes/PRP composites. Safranin-O staining and Masson's trichrome staining showed proteoglycan and collagen were produced in matrices. In contrast, no tissue formed in the PRP-alone group.

CONCLUSIONS

This study suggests the feasibility of using PRP as injectable scaffold seeded with chondrocytes to regenerate cartilage and showed the potential of using this method for the reconstruction of cartilage defects.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, PR China.

    , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Animals
    Biocompatible Materials
    Bone Regeneration
    Cartilage
    Cell Transplantation
    Cells, Cultured
    Chondrocytes
    Chondrogenesis
    Guided Tissue Regeneration
    Implants, Experimental
    Injections, Subcutaneous
    Male
    Platelet-Rich Plasma
    Rabbits
    Tissue Engineering

    Pub Type(s)

    Evaluation Studies
    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    17884521

    Citation

    TY - JOUR T1 - Autologous injectable tissue-engineered cartilage by using platelet-rich plasma: experimental study in a rabbit model. AU - Wu,Wei, AU - Chen,Fulin, AU - Liu,Yanpu, AU - Ma,Qin, AU - Mao,Tianqiu, PY - 2006/03/28/received PY - 2006/06/19/revised PY - 2006/11/15/accepted PY - 2007/9/22/pubmed PY - 2007/11/6/medline PY - 2007/9/22/entrez SP - 1951 EP - 7 JF - Journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery : official journal of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons JO - J. Oral Maxillofac. Surg. VL - 65 IS - 10 N2 - PURPOSE: Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been widely applied to promote tissue healing and used as a novel injectable scaffold in bone tissue engineering. However, there is no report about its feasibility to support chondrogenesis. This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of a PRP carrier to deliver chondrocytes and regenerate cartilage tissues in a rabbit model via injection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eight New Zealand rabbits were divided into a chondrocytes/PRP group (n = 4) and a PRP-alone group (n = 4). Chondrocytes harvested from the auricular root of New Zealand rabbits were cultured and harvested. The chondrocytes were then mixed with PRP solution to generate chondrocytes/PRP composites with final cellular density of 5.0 x 10(7)/mL. Bovine thrombin was used as a cross-linking agent to gel chondrocytes/PRP composites, then, the composites were injected subcutaneously into the dorsal tissue of cell donor animals. As controls, PRP alone was injected into another 4 rabbits. At the second month after injection, rabbits were prepared for magnetic resonance imaging. The samples were then harvested for macroscopical examination, histological analysis, and glycosaminoglycan quantification. RESULTS: Two months after injection, the hard knobbles were easily palpated under the dorsal skin of the animals in the chondrocytes/PRP group, and magnetic resonance images showed the presence of cartilage-like tissues. In histological analysis, formation of new cartilage was observed in the chondrocytes/PRP composites. Safranin-O staining and Masson's trichrome staining showed proteoglycan and collagen were produced in matrices. In contrast, no tissue formed in the PRP-alone group. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests the feasibility of using PRP as injectable scaffold seeded with chondrocytes to regenerate cartilage and showed the potential of using this method for the reconstruction of cartilage defects. SN - 0278-2391 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17884521/abstract/Autologous_injectable_tissue_engineered_cartilage_by_using_platelet_rich_plasma:_experimental_study_in_a_rabbit_model_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0278-2391(06)02107-0 ER -