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Cost-effectiveness of oral gemifloxacin versus intravenous ceftriaxone followed by oral cefuroxime with/without a macrolide for the treatment of hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia.
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 2008 Jan; 60(1):59-64.DM

Abstract

We studied the cost-effectiveness of oral gemifloxacin with intravenous ceftriaxone followed by oral cefuroxime with or without a macrolide to treat patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia. Data were prospectively collected as part of a randomized multicenter study. The costs evaluated included antimicrobial acquisition (1st level); plus preparation, dispensing, and administration costs, and treatment of antimicrobial-related adverse events and clinical failures (2nd level); plus per diem costs for hospital stay related to study drug administration (3rd level). At follow-up, clinical success was similar between gemifloxacin (76.9%)- and ceftriaxone (79.1%)-treated patients. The median 1st-level costs for gemifloxacin and ceftriaxone were $136 and $470 (P<0.001), respectively. For the 2nd level, these costs were $158 and $542 (P<0.001), and for the 3rd level, these were $5052 and $5789 (P=0.025), respectively. The median cost per expected success was $6568 for gemifloxacin and $7321 for ceftriaxone (P=0.29). Oral gemifloxacin is clinically effective and has an economic advantage over ceftriaxone, followed by oral cefuroxime with or without a macrolide.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute for Clinical Pharmacodynamics, Ordway Research Institute, Albany, NY 12208, USA. sbhavnani-icpd@ordwayresearch.orgNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17889491

Citation

Bhavnani, Sujata M., and Paul G. Ambrose. "Cost-effectiveness of Oral Gemifloxacin Versus Intravenous Ceftriaxone Followed By Oral Cefuroxime With/without a Macrolide for the Treatment of Hospitalized Patients With Community-acquired Pneumonia." Diagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease, vol. 60, no. 1, 2008, pp. 59-64.
Bhavnani SM, Ambrose PG. Cost-effectiveness of oral gemifloxacin versus intravenous ceftriaxone followed by oral cefuroxime with/without a macrolide for the treatment of hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 2008;60(1):59-64.
Bhavnani, S. M., & Ambrose, P. G. (2008). Cost-effectiveness of oral gemifloxacin versus intravenous ceftriaxone followed by oral cefuroxime with/without a macrolide for the treatment of hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Diagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease, 60(1), 59-64.
Bhavnani SM, Ambrose PG. Cost-effectiveness of Oral Gemifloxacin Versus Intravenous Ceftriaxone Followed By Oral Cefuroxime With/without a Macrolide for the Treatment of Hospitalized Patients With Community-acquired Pneumonia. Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 2008;60(1):59-64. PubMed PMID: 17889491.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cost-effectiveness of oral gemifloxacin versus intravenous ceftriaxone followed by oral cefuroxime with/without a macrolide for the treatment of hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia. AU - Bhavnani,Sujata M, AU - Ambrose,Paul G, Y1 - 2007/09/21/ PY - 2006/10/05/received PY - 2007/07/09/revised PY - 2007/07/10/accepted PY - 2007/9/25/pubmed PY - 2008/4/11/medline PY - 2007/9/25/entrez SP - 59 EP - 64 JF - Diagnostic microbiology and infectious disease JO - Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis VL - 60 IS - 1 N2 - We studied the cost-effectiveness of oral gemifloxacin with intravenous ceftriaxone followed by oral cefuroxime with or without a macrolide to treat patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia. Data were prospectively collected as part of a randomized multicenter study. The costs evaluated included antimicrobial acquisition (1st level); plus preparation, dispensing, and administration costs, and treatment of antimicrobial-related adverse events and clinical failures (2nd level); plus per diem costs for hospital stay related to study drug administration (3rd level). At follow-up, clinical success was similar between gemifloxacin (76.9%)- and ceftriaxone (79.1%)-treated patients. The median 1st-level costs for gemifloxacin and ceftriaxone were $136 and $470 (P<0.001), respectively. For the 2nd level, these costs were $158 and $542 (P<0.001), and for the 3rd level, these were $5052 and $5789 (P=0.025), respectively. The median cost per expected success was $6568 for gemifloxacin and $7321 for ceftriaxone (P=0.29). Oral gemifloxacin is clinically effective and has an economic advantage over ceftriaxone, followed by oral cefuroxime with or without a macrolide. SN - 0732-8893 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17889491/Cost_effectiveness_of_oral_gemifloxacin_versus_intravenous_ceftriaxone_followed_by_oral_cefuroxime_with/without_a_macrolide_for_the_treatment_of_hospitalized_patients_with_community_acquired_pneumonia_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0732-8893(07)00303-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -