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Iron and zinc deficiencies in China: what is a feasible and cost-effective strategy?
Public Health Nutr. 2008 Jun; 11(6):632-8.PH

Abstract

In order to prioritise interventions for micronutrient deficiencies in China, the populations affected by iron and zinc deficiencies were assessed based on data from the 2002 China National Nutrition and Health Survey. The costs and cost-effectiveness of supplementation, food diversification and food fortification were estimated using the standard World Health Organization ingredients approach. Results indicated that 30% of children (60 years), pregnant and lactating women, and 20% of women of reproductive age were anaemic, some 245 million people. Approximately 100 million people were affected by zinc deficiency (zinc intake inadequacy and stunting), the majority living in rural areas. Among interventions on iron and zinc deficiency, biofortification showed the lowest costs per capita, I 0.01 (international dollars), while dietary diversification through health education represented the highest costs at I 1148(international dollars). The cost-effectiveness of supplementation, food fortification and dietary diversification for iron deficiency alone was I 179(international dollars) , I 66 and I 103 (international dollars) per disability-adjusted life-year (DALY), respectively. Data for biofortification were not available. For zinc deficiency, the corresponding figures were I 399(international dollars), I 153(international dollars) and I 103(international dollars) per DALY, respectively. In conclusion, iron and zinc deficiencies are of great public health concern in China. Of the two long-term intervention strategies, i.e. dietary diversification and biofortification with improved varieties, the latter is especially feasible and cost-effective for rural populations. Supplementation and fortification can be used as short-term strategies for specific groups.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Institute for Nutrition and Food Safety, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100050, People's Republic of China. mags@chinacdc.net.cnNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17894916

Citation

Ma, Guansheng, et al. "Iron and Zinc Deficiencies in China: what Is a Feasible and Cost-effective Strategy?" Public Health Nutrition, vol. 11, no. 6, 2008, pp. 632-8.
Ma G, Jin Y, Li Y, et al. Iron and zinc deficiencies in China: what is a feasible and cost-effective strategy? Public Health Nutr. 2008;11(6):632-8.
Ma, G., Jin, Y., Li, Y., Zhai, F., Kok, F. J., Jacobsen, E., & Yang, X. (2008). Iron and zinc deficiencies in China: what is a feasible and cost-effective strategy? Public Health Nutrition, 11(6), 632-8.
Ma G, et al. Iron and Zinc Deficiencies in China: what Is a Feasible and Cost-effective Strategy. Public Health Nutr. 2008;11(6):632-8. PubMed PMID: 17894916.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Iron and zinc deficiencies in China: what is a feasible and cost-effective strategy? AU - Ma,Guansheng, AU - Jin,Ying, AU - Li,Yanping, AU - Zhai,Fengying, AU - Kok,Frans J, AU - Jacobsen,Evert, AU - Yang,Xiaoguang, Y1 - 2007/09/26/ PY - 2007/9/27/pubmed PY - 2008/10/1/medline PY - 2007/9/27/entrez SP - 632 EP - 8 JF - Public health nutrition JO - Public Health Nutr VL - 11 IS - 6 N2 - In order to prioritise interventions for micronutrient deficiencies in China, the populations affected by iron and zinc deficiencies were assessed based on data from the 2002 China National Nutrition and Health Survey. The costs and cost-effectiveness of supplementation, food diversification and food fortification were estimated using the standard World Health Organization ingredients approach. Results indicated that 30% of children (60 years), pregnant and lactating women, and 20% of women of reproductive age were anaemic, some 245 million people. Approximately 100 million people were affected by zinc deficiency (zinc intake inadequacy and stunting), the majority living in rural areas. Among interventions on iron and zinc deficiency, biofortification showed the lowest costs per capita, I 0.01 (international dollars), while dietary diversification through health education represented the highest costs at I 1148(international dollars). The cost-effectiveness of supplementation, food fortification and dietary diversification for iron deficiency alone was I 179(international dollars) , I 66 and I 103 (international dollars) per disability-adjusted life-year (DALY), respectively. Data for biofortification were not available. For zinc deficiency, the corresponding figures were I 399(international dollars), I 153(international dollars) and I 103(international dollars) per DALY, respectively. In conclusion, iron and zinc deficiencies are of great public health concern in China. Of the two long-term intervention strategies, i.e. dietary diversification and biofortification with improved varieties, the latter is especially feasible and cost-effective for rural populations. Supplementation and fortification can be used as short-term strategies for specific groups. SN - 1368-9800 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17894916/Iron_and_zinc_deficiencies_in_China:_what_is_a_feasible_and_cost_effective_strategy L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S1368980007001085/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -