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Use of ultrasound measurement of the inferior vena cava diameter as an objective tool in the assessment of children with clinical dehydration.
Acad Emerg Med. 2007 Oct; 14(10):841-5.AE

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Bedside ultrasonography (US) measurement of the inferior vena cava (IVC) and aorta (Ao) may be useful in objectively assessing children with dehydration. The objectives of this study were 1) to compare the IVC and Ao diameters (IVC/Ao) ratio of dehydrated children with controls and 2) to compare the IVC/Ao ratio before and after intravenous (i.v.) rehydration in children with dehydration.

METHODS

This prospective observational study was performed in an urban pediatric emergency department. Children between 6 months and 16 years of age with clinical evidence of dehydration were enrolled. Bedside US measurements of the IVC and Ao were taken before and immediately after i.v. fluids were administered. An age-, gender-, and weight-matched control without dehydration was enrolled for each subject. The IVC/Ao ratios of subjects and controls were compared using Wilcoxon signed rank test, as were the ratios before and after i.v. hydration for each subject.

RESULTS

Thirty-six pairs of subjects and matched controls were enrolled. The IVC/Ao ratios in the subjects were lower as compared with controls (mean of 0.75 vs. 1.01), with a mean difference of 0.26 (95% confidence interval = 0.18 to 0.35). In subjects, the IVC/Ao ratios were significantly lower before i.v. hydration (mean of 0.75 vs. 1.09), with a mean difference of 0.34 (95% confidence interval = 0.29 to 0.39).

CONCLUSIONS

As measured by bedside US measurement, the IVC/Ao ratio is lower in children clinically assessed to be dehydrated. Furthermore, it increases with administration of i.v. fluid boluses.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Section of Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. lei.chen@yale.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Controlled Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17898246

Citation

Chen, Lei, et al. "Use of Ultrasound Measurement of the Inferior Vena Cava Diameter as an Objective Tool in the Assessment of Children With Clinical Dehydration." Academic Emergency Medicine : Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine, vol. 14, no. 10, 2007, pp. 841-5.
Chen L, Kim Y, Santucci KA. Use of ultrasound measurement of the inferior vena cava diameter as an objective tool in the assessment of children with clinical dehydration. Acad Emerg Med. 2007;14(10):841-5.
Chen, L., Kim, Y., & Santucci, K. A. (2007). Use of ultrasound measurement of the inferior vena cava diameter as an objective tool in the assessment of children with clinical dehydration. Academic Emergency Medicine : Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine, 14(10), 841-5.
Chen L, Kim Y, Santucci KA. Use of Ultrasound Measurement of the Inferior Vena Cava Diameter as an Objective Tool in the Assessment of Children With Clinical Dehydration. Acad Emerg Med. 2007;14(10):841-5. PubMed PMID: 17898246.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Use of ultrasound measurement of the inferior vena cava diameter as an objective tool in the assessment of children with clinical dehydration. AU - Chen,Lei, AU - Kim,Yunie, AU - Santucci,Karen A, PY - 2007/9/28/pubmed PY - 2007/12/6/medline PY - 2007/9/28/entrez SP - 841 EP - 5 JF - Academic emergency medicine : official journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine JO - Acad Emerg Med VL - 14 IS - 10 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Bedside ultrasonography (US) measurement of the inferior vena cava (IVC) and aorta (Ao) may be useful in objectively assessing children with dehydration. The objectives of this study were 1) to compare the IVC and Ao diameters (IVC/Ao) ratio of dehydrated children with controls and 2) to compare the IVC/Ao ratio before and after intravenous (i.v.) rehydration in children with dehydration. METHODS: This prospective observational study was performed in an urban pediatric emergency department. Children between 6 months and 16 years of age with clinical evidence of dehydration were enrolled. Bedside US measurements of the IVC and Ao were taken before and immediately after i.v. fluids were administered. An age-, gender-, and weight-matched control without dehydration was enrolled for each subject. The IVC/Ao ratios of subjects and controls were compared using Wilcoxon signed rank test, as were the ratios before and after i.v. hydration for each subject. RESULTS: Thirty-six pairs of subjects and matched controls were enrolled. The IVC/Ao ratios in the subjects were lower as compared with controls (mean of 0.75 vs. 1.01), with a mean difference of 0.26 (95% confidence interval = 0.18 to 0.35). In subjects, the IVC/Ao ratios were significantly lower before i.v. hydration (mean of 0.75 vs. 1.09), with a mean difference of 0.34 (95% confidence interval = 0.29 to 0.39). CONCLUSIONS: As measured by bedside US measurement, the IVC/Ao ratio is lower in children clinically assessed to be dehydrated. Furthermore, it increases with administration of i.v. fluid boluses. SN - 1553-2712 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17898246/Use_of_ultrasound_measurement_of_the_inferior_vena_cava_diameter_as_an_objective_tool_in_the_assessment_of_children_with_clinical_dehydration_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=1069-6563&date=2007&volume=14&issue=10&spage=841 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -