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Functional central nervous system imaging in the investigation of obstructive sleep apnea.
Curr Opin Pulm Med 2007; 13(6):479-83CO

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW

This review summarizes recent neuroimaging research into cerebral alterations observed in obstructive sleep apnea. Studies applying neuroimaging techniques over the past 10 years have made important contributions to our understanding of the neurocognitive changes associated with this disorder.

RECENT FINDINGS

Converging experiments using different methods (transcranial Doppler, event-related potentials, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging) demonstrated changes in cerebral blood flow, metabolism, morphology, and brain activation in response to cognitive challenges in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

SUMMARY

Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with unique cerebral alterations that may explain the changes in behavior and cognition observed. Their high temporal and spatial resolution mean that functional magnetic resonance imaging techniques may provide important information regarding the cerebral changes associated with cognitive performance in obstructive sleep apnea. Studies should control for obstructive sleep apnea-associated changes in basal cerebral blood flow, however. In addition, further research using standardized morphologic techniques is needed to better localize and characterize the pattern of neuronal loss in obstructive sleep apnea. Likewise, techniques to examine cerebral white matter integrity will be important in fully elucidating the impact of obstructive sleep apnea on the brain, as well as any recovery in brain function and cognitive performance following treatment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, University of California, and Research Services, Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, California 92161, USA. layalon@ucsd.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17901752

Citation

Ayalon, Liat, and Silke Peterson. "Functional Central Nervous System Imaging in the Investigation of Obstructive Sleep Apnea." Current Opinion in Pulmonary Medicine, vol. 13, no. 6, 2007, pp. 479-83.
Ayalon L, Peterson S. Functional central nervous system imaging in the investigation of obstructive sleep apnea. Curr Opin Pulm Med. 2007;13(6):479-83.
Ayalon, L., & Peterson, S. (2007). Functional central nervous system imaging in the investigation of obstructive sleep apnea. Current Opinion in Pulmonary Medicine, 13(6), pp. 479-83.
Ayalon L, Peterson S. Functional Central Nervous System Imaging in the Investigation of Obstructive Sleep Apnea. Curr Opin Pulm Med. 2007;13(6):479-83. PubMed PMID: 17901752.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Functional central nervous system imaging in the investigation of obstructive sleep apnea. AU - Ayalon,Liat, AU - Peterson,Silke, PY - 2007/9/29/pubmed PY - 2008/1/18/medline PY - 2007/9/29/entrez SP - 479 EP - 83 JF - Current opinion in pulmonary medicine JO - Curr Opin Pulm Med VL - 13 IS - 6 N2 - PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review summarizes recent neuroimaging research into cerebral alterations observed in obstructive sleep apnea. Studies applying neuroimaging techniques over the past 10 years have made important contributions to our understanding of the neurocognitive changes associated with this disorder. RECENT FINDINGS: Converging experiments using different methods (transcranial Doppler, event-related potentials, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging) demonstrated changes in cerebral blood flow, metabolism, morphology, and brain activation in response to cognitive challenges in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. SUMMARY: Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with unique cerebral alterations that may explain the changes in behavior and cognition observed. Their high temporal and spatial resolution mean that functional magnetic resonance imaging techniques may provide important information regarding the cerebral changes associated with cognitive performance in obstructive sleep apnea. Studies should control for obstructive sleep apnea-associated changes in basal cerebral blood flow, however. In addition, further research using standardized morphologic techniques is needed to better localize and characterize the pattern of neuronal loss in obstructive sleep apnea. Likewise, techniques to examine cerebral white matter integrity will be important in fully elucidating the impact of obstructive sleep apnea on the brain, as well as any recovery in brain function and cognitive performance following treatment. SN - 1070-5287 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17901752/Functional_central_nervous_system_imaging_in_the_investigation_of_obstructive_sleep_apnea_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=17901752 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -