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Explaining differences in birthweight between ethnic populations. The Generation R Study.
BJOG. 2007 Dec; 114(12):1557-65.BJOG

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine whether differences in birthweight of various ethnic groups residing in The Netherlands can be explained by determinants of birthweight.

DESIGN

Population-based birth cohort study.

SETTING

Data of pregnant women and their partners in Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

POPULATION

We examined data of 6044 pregnant women with a Dutch, Moroccan, Turkish, Capeverdean, Antillean, Surinamese-Creole, Surinamese-Hindustani and Surinamese-other ethnic background.

METHODS

Regression analyses were used to assess the impact of biomedical, socio-demographic and lifestyle-related determinants on birthweight differences.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE

Birthweight was established immediately after delivery in grams.

RESULTS

Compared with mean birthweight of offspring of Dutch women (3485 g, SD 555), the mean birthweight was lower in all non-Dutch populations, except in Moroccans. Differences ranged from an 88-g lower birthweight in offspring of the Turkish women to a 424-g lower birthweight in offspring of Surinamese-Hindustani women. Differences in gestational age, maternal and paternal height largely explained the lower birthweight in the Turkish, Antillean, Surinamese-Creole and Surinamese-other populations. Differences in birthweight between the Dutch and the Capeverdean and Surinamese-Hindustani populations could only partly be explained by the studied determinants.

CONCLUSIONS

These results confirm significant differences in birthweight between ethnic populations that can only partly be understood from established determinants of birthweight. The part that is understood points to the importance of determinants that cannot easily be modified, such as parental height. Further study is necessary to obtain a fuller understanding.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Generation R Study Group, Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. j.troe@erasmusmc.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17903227

Citation

Troe, E J W M., et al. "Explaining Differences in Birthweight Between Ethnic Populations. the Generation R Study." BJOG : an International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, vol. 114, no. 12, 2007, pp. 1557-65.
Troe EJ, Raat H, Jaddoe VW, et al. Explaining differences in birthweight between ethnic populations. The Generation R Study. BJOG. 2007;114(12):1557-65.
Troe, E. J., Raat, H., Jaddoe, V. W., Hofman, A., Looman, C. W., Moll, H. A., Steegers, E. A., Verhulst, F. C., Witteman, J. C., & Mackenbach, J. P. (2007). Explaining differences in birthweight between ethnic populations. The Generation R Study. BJOG : an International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 114(12), 1557-65.
Troe EJ, et al. Explaining Differences in Birthweight Between Ethnic Populations. the Generation R Study. BJOG. 2007;114(12):1557-65. PubMed PMID: 17903227.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Explaining differences in birthweight between ethnic populations. The Generation R Study. AU - Troe,E J W M, AU - Raat,H, AU - Jaddoe,V W V, AU - Hofman,A, AU - Looman,C W N, AU - Moll,H A, AU - Steegers,E A P, AU - Verhulst,F C, AU - Witteman,J C M, AU - Mackenbach,J P, Y1 - 2007/09/27/ PY - 2007/10/2/pubmed PY - 2008/1/16/medline PY - 2007/10/2/entrez SP - 1557 EP - 65 JF - BJOG : an international journal of obstetrics and gynaecology JO - BJOG VL - 114 IS - 12 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine whether differences in birthweight of various ethnic groups residing in The Netherlands can be explained by determinants of birthweight. DESIGN: Population-based birth cohort study. SETTING: Data of pregnant women and their partners in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. POPULATION: We examined data of 6044 pregnant women with a Dutch, Moroccan, Turkish, Capeverdean, Antillean, Surinamese-Creole, Surinamese-Hindustani and Surinamese-other ethnic background. METHODS: Regression analyses were used to assess the impact of biomedical, socio-demographic and lifestyle-related determinants on birthweight differences. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Birthweight was established immediately after delivery in grams. RESULTS: Compared with mean birthweight of offspring of Dutch women (3485 g, SD 555), the mean birthweight was lower in all non-Dutch populations, except in Moroccans. Differences ranged from an 88-g lower birthweight in offspring of the Turkish women to a 424-g lower birthweight in offspring of Surinamese-Hindustani women. Differences in gestational age, maternal and paternal height largely explained the lower birthweight in the Turkish, Antillean, Surinamese-Creole and Surinamese-other populations. Differences in birthweight between the Dutch and the Capeverdean and Surinamese-Hindustani populations could only partly be explained by the studied determinants. CONCLUSIONS: These results confirm significant differences in birthweight between ethnic populations that can only partly be understood from established determinants of birthweight. The part that is understood points to the importance of determinants that cannot easily be modified, such as parental height. Further study is necessary to obtain a fuller understanding. SN - 1471-0528 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17903227/Explaining_differences_in_birthweight_between_ethnic_populations__The_Generation_R_Study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1471-0528.2007.01508.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -