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The programming effects of early growth.
Early Hum Dev 2007; 83(12):743-8EH

Abstract

Early-life growth patterns predict subsequent disease risk. The ontogenetic development of body composition appears to play a key role in such associations, but details have only recently begun to emerge. Studies in diverse populations consistently associate birthweight with subsequent lean mass. Associations with subsequent adiposity show less consistency, and may be gender-specific, while associations between infant weight gain and subsequent body composition appear to differ systematically between industrialised and developing countries. Existing evidence suggests two primary pathways whereby the body composition development contributes to disease risk. First, poor growth during fetal life and infancy appears permanently to constrain lean mass, thereby constraining metabolic capacity to tolerate a rich diet. Second, rapid catch-up growth and childhood weight gain appear to divert energy disproportionately to adipose issue, particularly in the abdomen, thereby increasing metabolic load. These complementary processes may account for disease risk being greatest in those born small who subsequently become large.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Childhood Nutrition Research Centre, University College London, Institute of Child Health, London, UK. J.Wells@ich.ucl.ac.uk

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17904771

Citation

Wells, Jonathan C K.. "The Programming Effects of Early Growth." Early Human Development, vol. 83, no. 12, 2007, pp. 743-8.
Wells JC. The programming effects of early growth. Early Hum Dev. 2007;83(12):743-8.
Wells, J. C. (2007). The programming effects of early growth. Early Human Development, 83(12), pp. 743-8.
Wells JC. The Programming Effects of Early Growth. Early Hum Dev. 2007;83(12):743-8. PubMed PMID: 17904771.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The programming effects of early growth. A1 - Wells,Jonathan C K, Y1 - 2007/09/29/ PY - 2007/10/2/pubmed PY - 2008/1/29/medline PY - 2007/10/2/entrez SP - 743 EP - 8 JF - Early human development JO - Early Hum. Dev. VL - 83 IS - 12 N2 - Early-life growth patterns predict subsequent disease risk. The ontogenetic development of body composition appears to play a key role in such associations, but details have only recently begun to emerge. Studies in diverse populations consistently associate birthweight with subsequent lean mass. Associations with subsequent adiposity show less consistency, and may be gender-specific, while associations between infant weight gain and subsequent body composition appear to differ systematically between industrialised and developing countries. Existing evidence suggests two primary pathways whereby the body composition development contributes to disease risk. First, poor growth during fetal life and infancy appears permanently to constrain lean mass, thereby constraining metabolic capacity to tolerate a rich diet. Second, rapid catch-up growth and childhood weight gain appear to divert energy disproportionately to adipose issue, particularly in the abdomen, thereby increasing metabolic load. These complementary processes may account for disease risk being greatest in those born small who subsequently become large. SN - 0378-3782 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17904771/The_programming_effects_of_early_growth_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0378-3782(07)00158-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -