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[Acute renal failure due to sulfadiazine crystalluria].
An Med Interna. 2007 May; 24(5):235-8.AM

Abstract

Focal necrotizing encephalitis due to Toxoplasma gondii infection represents one of the most common opportunistic infection in patients with the acquired inmunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and the treatment is commonly with a combination sulphadiazine, and pyrimethamine. A major side effect of sulfadiazine therapy is the occurrence of crystallization in the urinary collecting system. We report a patient with AIDS and Toxoplasmic encephalitis treated with sulfadiazine who developed acute renal failure. Renal ultrasound demonstrated echogenic areas within the renal parenchyma, presumed to be sulfa crystals. Renal failure and ultrasound findings resolved rapidly with hydratation and administration of alkali. Patients infected with AIDS frequently have characteristic that increase intratubular crystal precipitation and they require treatment with one or more of the drugs that are associated with crystal-induced renal failure. Controlled alkalinization of the urine and high fluid intake are recommended for prophylaxis of crystalluria. The literature concerning crystalluria and renal failure due to sulfadiazine is reviewed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Servicio de Nefrología, Hospital Universitario Son Dureta, Palma de Mallorca, Spain. fdelprada@senefro.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

spa

PubMed ID

17907889

Citation

de la Prada Alvarez, F J., et al. "[Acute Renal Failure Due to Sulfadiazine Crystalluria]." Anales De Medicina Interna (Madrid, Spain : 1984), vol. 24, no. 5, 2007, pp. 235-8.
de la Prada Alvarez FJ, Prados Gallardo AM, Tugores Vázquez A, et al. [Acute renal failure due to sulfadiazine crystalluria]. An Med Interna. 2007;24(5):235-8.
de la Prada Alvarez, F. J., Prados Gallardo, A. M., Tugores Vázquez, A., Uriol Rivera, M., & Morey Molina, A. (2007). [Acute renal failure due to sulfadiazine crystalluria]. Anales De Medicina Interna (Madrid, Spain : 1984), 24(5), 235-8.
de la Prada Alvarez FJ, et al. [Acute Renal Failure Due to Sulfadiazine Crystalluria]. An Med Interna. 2007;24(5):235-8. PubMed PMID: 17907889.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Acute renal failure due to sulfadiazine crystalluria]. AU - de la Prada Alvarez,F J, AU - Prados Gallardo,A M, AU - Tugores Vázquez,A, AU - Uriol Rivera,M, AU - Morey Molina,A, PY - 2007/10/3/pubmed PY - 2007/12/6/medline PY - 2007/10/3/entrez SP - 235 EP - 8 JF - Anales de medicina interna (Madrid, Spain : 1984) JO - An Med Interna VL - 24 IS - 5 N2 - Focal necrotizing encephalitis due to Toxoplasma gondii infection represents one of the most common opportunistic infection in patients with the acquired inmunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and the treatment is commonly with a combination sulphadiazine, and pyrimethamine. A major side effect of sulfadiazine therapy is the occurrence of crystallization in the urinary collecting system. We report a patient with AIDS and Toxoplasmic encephalitis treated with sulfadiazine who developed acute renal failure. Renal ultrasound demonstrated echogenic areas within the renal parenchyma, presumed to be sulfa crystals. Renal failure and ultrasound findings resolved rapidly with hydratation and administration of alkali. Patients infected with AIDS frequently have characteristic that increase intratubular crystal precipitation and they require treatment with one or more of the drugs that are associated with crystal-induced renal failure. Controlled alkalinization of the urine and high fluid intake are recommended for prophylaxis of crystalluria. The literature concerning crystalluria and renal failure due to sulfadiazine is reviewed. SN - 0212-7199 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17907889/[Acute_renal_failure_due_to_sulfadiazine_crystalluria]_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -