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Vitamin D status in renal transplant recipients.
Am J Transplant. 2007 Nov; 7(11):2546-52.AJ

Abstract

Vitamin D plays an important role in calcium homeostasis. Renal transplant recipients may be more susceptible to reduced levels because of decreased sun exposure and steroid therapy. This study aimed to determine vitamin D status after renal transplantation and its effect on parathyroid hormone (PTH) and bone mineral density (BMD). We measured serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels (25-OHD) in 244 renal transplant recipients, divided into two groups, 104 recently transplanted (less than 1 year) and 140 long-term. Vitamin D status was defined according to NKF/KDOQI guidelines. Mean 25-OHD levels were 33 +/- 19 nmol/L and 42 +/- 20 nmol/L, respectively, for the recent and long-term transplant recipients. Vitamin D insufficiency was present in 29% and 43%, deficiency in 56% and 46% and severe deficiency in 12% and 5%, respectively. An inverse correlation was found between logPTH and 25-OHD (r=-0.2, p= 0.019) in long-term but not in recently transplanted patients. No correlation was found between 25-OHD levels and BMD. Hypercalcaemia was present in 40% of the recently transplanted recipients and 25% of the long-term. In conclusion 25-OHD was low in virtually all of our renal transplant recipients and may aggravate secondary hyperparathyroidism, but its correction may be difficult in patients with hypercalcaemia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Nottingham Renal and Transplant Unit, Nottingham University Hospitals, City Campus, Nottingham, UK. stavroulopoulos@yahoo.co.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17908281

Citation

Stavroulopoulos, A, et al. "Vitamin D Status in Renal Transplant Recipients." American Journal of Transplantation : Official Journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons, vol. 7, no. 11, 2007, pp. 2546-52.
Stavroulopoulos A, Cassidy MJ, Porter CJ, et al. Vitamin D status in renal transplant recipients. Am J Transplant. 2007;7(11):2546-52.
Stavroulopoulos, A., Cassidy, M. J., Porter, C. J., Hosking, D. J., & Roe, S. D. (2007). Vitamin D status in renal transplant recipients. American Journal of Transplantation : Official Journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons, 7(11), 2546-52.
Stavroulopoulos A, et al. Vitamin D Status in Renal Transplant Recipients. Am J Transplant. 2007;7(11):2546-52. PubMed PMID: 17908281.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin D status in renal transplant recipients. AU - Stavroulopoulos,A, AU - Cassidy,M J D, AU - Porter,C J, AU - Hosking,D J, AU - Roe,S D, Y1 - 2007/10/01/ PY - 2007/10/3/pubmed PY - 2008/1/8/medline PY - 2007/10/3/entrez SP - 2546 EP - 52 JF - American journal of transplantation : official journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons JO - Am J Transplant VL - 7 IS - 11 N2 - Vitamin D plays an important role in calcium homeostasis. Renal transplant recipients may be more susceptible to reduced levels because of decreased sun exposure and steroid therapy. This study aimed to determine vitamin D status after renal transplantation and its effect on parathyroid hormone (PTH) and bone mineral density (BMD). We measured serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels (25-OHD) in 244 renal transplant recipients, divided into two groups, 104 recently transplanted (less than 1 year) and 140 long-term. Vitamin D status was defined according to NKF/KDOQI guidelines. Mean 25-OHD levels were 33 +/- 19 nmol/L and 42 +/- 20 nmol/L, respectively, for the recent and long-term transplant recipients. Vitamin D insufficiency was present in 29% and 43%, deficiency in 56% and 46% and severe deficiency in 12% and 5%, respectively. An inverse correlation was found between logPTH and 25-OHD (r=-0.2, p= 0.019) in long-term but not in recently transplanted patients. No correlation was found between 25-OHD levels and BMD. Hypercalcaemia was present in 40% of the recently transplanted recipients and 25% of the long-term. In conclusion 25-OHD was low in virtually all of our renal transplant recipients and may aggravate secondary hyperparathyroidism, but its correction may be difficult in patients with hypercalcaemia. SN - 1600-6135 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17908281/Vitamin_D_status_in_renal_transplant_recipients_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-6143.2007.01978.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -