Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Persistent beneficial effects of breast milk ingested in the neonatal intensive care unit on outcomes of extremely low birth weight infants at 30 months of age.
Pediatrics. 2007 Oct; 120(4):e953-9.Ped

Abstract

BACKGROUND

We previously reported beneficial effects of breast milk ingestion by infants with extremely low birth weight in the NICU on developmental outcomes at 18 months' corrected age. The objective of this study was to determine whether these effects of breast milk in infants with extremely low birth weight persisted at 30 months' corrected age.

METHODS

Nutrition data, including enteral and parenteral feeds, were prospectively collected, and 30 months' corrected age follow-up assessments were completed on 773 infants with extremely low birth weight who participated in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network Glutamine Trial. A total of 593 ingested some breast milk during the neonatal hospitalization, and 180 ingested none. Neonatal feeding characteristics and morbidities and 30-month interim history, neurodevelopmental outcomes, and growth parameters were analyzed. Children were divided into quintiles of breast milk volume to evaluate the effects of volume of human milk ingested during the NICU hospitalization.

RESULTS

At 30 months, increased ingestion of breast milk was associated with higher Bayley Mental Developmental Index scores, higher Bayley behavior score percentiles for emotional regulation, and fewer rehospitalizations between discharge and 30 months. There were no differences in growth parameters or cerebral palsy. For every 10 mL/kg per day increase in breast milk, the Mental Developmental Index increased by 0.59 points, the Psychomotor Developmental Index by 0.56 points, and the total behavior percentile score by 0.99 points, and the risk of rehospitalization between discharge and 30 months decreased by 5%.

CONCLUSIONS

Beneficial effects of ingestion of breast milk in the NICU persist at 30 months' corrected age in this vulnerable extremely low birth weight population. Continued efforts must be made to offer breast milk to all extremely low birth weight infants both in the NICU and after discharge.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, Brown Medical School, Providence, Rhode Island, USA. betty_vohr@brown.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17908750

Citation

Vohr, Betty R., et al. "Persistent Beneficial Effects of Breast Milk Ingested in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit On Outcomes of Extremely Low Birth Weight Infants at 30 Months of Age." Pediatrics, vol. 120, no. 4, 2007, pp. e953-9.
Vohr BR, Poindexter BB, Dusick AM, et al. Persistent beneficial effects of breast milk ingested in the neonatal intensive care unit on outcomes of extremely low birth weight infants at 30 months of age. Pediatrics. 2007;120(4):e953-9.
Vohr, B. R., Poindexter, B. B., Dusick, A. M., McKinley, L. T., Higgins, R. D., Langer, J. C., & Poole, W. K. (2007). Persistent beneficial effects of breast milk ingested in the neonatal intensive care unit on outcomes of extremely low birth weight infants at 30 months of age. Pediatrics, 120(4), e953-9.
Vohr BR, et al. Persistent Beneficial Effects of Breast Milk Ingested in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit On Outcomes of Extremely Low Birth Weight Infants at 30 Months of Age. Pediatrics. 2007;120(4):e953-9. PubMed PMID: 17908750.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Persistent beneficial effects of breast milk ingested in the neonatal intensive care unit on outcomes of extremely low birth weight infants at 30 months of age. AU - Vohr,Betty R, AU - Poindexter,Brenda B, AU - Dusick,Anna M, AU - McKinley,Leslie T, AU - Higgins,Rosemary D, AU - Langer,John C, AU - Poole,W Kenneth, AU - ,, PY - 2007/10/3/pubmed PY - 2007/10/30/medline PY - 2007/10/3/entrez SP - e953 EP - 9 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 120 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: We previously reported beneficial effects of breast milk ingestion by infants with extremely low birth weight in the NICU on developmental outcomes at 18 months' corrected age. The objective of this study was to determine whether these effects of breast milk in infants with extremely low birth weight persisted at 30 months' corrected age. METHODS: Nutrition data, including enteral and parenteral feeds, were prospectively collected, and 30 months' corrected age follow-up assessments were completed on 773 infants with extremely low birth weight who participated in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network Glutamine Trial. A total of 593 ingested some breast milk during the neonatal hospitalization, and 180 ingested none. Neonatal feeding characteristics and morbidities and 30-month interim history, neurodevelopmental outcomes, and growth parameters were analyzed. Children were divided into quintiles of breast milk volume to evaluate the effects of volume of human milk ingested during the NICU hospitalization. RESULTS: At 30 months, increased ingestion of breast milk was associated with higher Bayley Mental Developmental Index scores, higher Bayley behavior score percentiles for emotional regulation, and fewer rehospitalizations between discharge and 30 months. There were no differences in growth parameters or cerebral palsy. For every 10 mL/kg per day increase in breast milk, the Mental Developmental Index increased by 0.59 points, the Psychomotor Developmental Index by 0.56 points, and the total behavior percentile score by 0.99 points, and the risk of rehospitalization between discharge and 30 months decreased by 5%. CONCLUSIONS: Beneficial effects of ingestion of breast milk in the NICU persist at 30 months' corrected age in this vulnerable extremely low birth weight population. Continued efforts must be made to offer breast milk to all extremely low birth weight infants both in the NICU and after discharge. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17908750/Persistent_beneficial_effects_of_breast_milk_ingested_in_the_neonatal_intensive_care_unit_on_outcomes_of_extremely_low_birth_weight_infants_at_30_months_of_age_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=17908750 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -