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Effect of hydration state on strength, power, and resistance exercise performance.
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2007 Oct; 39(10):1817-24.MS

Abstract

PURPOSE

Although many studies have attempted to examine the effect of hypohydration on strength, power, and high-intensity endurance, few have successfully isolated changes in total body water from other variables that alter performance (e.g., increased core temperature), and none have documented the influence of hypohydration on an isotonic, multiset, multirepetition exercise bout typical of resistance exercise training. Further, no investigations document the effect of hypohydration on the ability of the central nervous system to stimulate the musculature, despite numerous scientists suggesting this possibility. The purposes of this study were to examine the isolated effect of hydration state on 1) strength, power, and the performance of acute resistance exercise, and 2) central activation ratio (CAR).

METHODS

Seven healthy resistance-trained males (age = 23 +/- 4 yr, body mass = 87.8 +/- 6.8 kg, body fat = 11.5 +/- 5.2%) completed three resistance exercise bouts in different hydration states: euhydrated (EU), hypohydrated by approximately 2.5% body mass (HY25), and hypohydrated by approximately 5.0% body mass (HY50). Investigators manipulated hydration status via exercise-heat stress and controlled fluid intake 1 d preceding testing.

RESULTS

Body mass decreased 2.4 +/- 0.4 and 4.8 +/- 0.4% during HY25 and HY50, respectively. No significant differences existed among trials in vertical jump height, peak lower-body power (assessed via jump squat), or peak lower-body force (assessed via isometric back squat). CAR tended to decrease as hypohydration increased (EU = 95.6 +/- 4.9%, HY25 = 94.0 +/- 3.1%, HY50 = 92.5 +/- 5.1%; P = 0.075, eta(p)(2) = 0.41). When evaluated as a function of the percentage of total work completed during a six-set back squat protocol, hypohydration significantly decreased resistance exercise performance during sets 2-3 and 2-5 for HY25 and HY50, respectively.

CONCLUSION

These data indicate that hypohydration attenuates resistance exercise performance; the role of central drive as the causative mechanism driving these responses merits further research.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Human Performance Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA. djudelson@fullerton.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17909410

Citation

Judelson, Daniel A., et al. "Effect of Hydration State On Strength, Power, and Resistance Exercise Performance." Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 39, no. 10, 2007, pp. 1817-24.
Judelson DA, Maresh CM, Farrell MJ, et al. Effect of hydration state on strength, power, and resistance exercise performance. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2007;39(10):1817-24.
Judelson, D. A., Maresh, C. M., Farrell, M. J., Yamamoto, L. M., Armstrong, L. E., Kraemer, W. J., Volek, J. S., Spiering, B. A., Casa, D. J., & Anderson, J. M. (2007). Effect of hydration state on strength, power, and resistance exercise performance. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 39(10), 1817-24.
Judelson DA, et al. Effect of Hydration State On Strength, Power, and Resistance Exercise Performance. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2007;39(10):1817-24. PubMed PMID: 17909410.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of hydration state on strength, power, and resistance exercise performance. AU - Judelson,Daniel A, AU - Maresh,Carl M, AU - Farrell,Mark J, AU - Yamamoto,Linda M, AU - Armstrong,Lawrence E, AU - Kraemer,William J, AU - Volek,Jeff S, AU - Spiering,Barry A, AU - Casa,Douglas J, AU - Anderson,Jeffrey M, PY - 2007/10/3/pubmed PY - 2008/1/12/medline PY - 2007/10/3/entrez SP - 1817 EP - 24 JF - Medicine and science in sports and exercise JO - Med Sci Sports Exerc VL - 39 IS - 10 N2 - PURPOSE: Although many studies have attempted to examine the effect of hypohydration on strength, power, and high-intensity endurance, few have successfully isolated changes in total body water from other variables that alter performance (e.g., increased core temperature), and none have documented the influence of hypohydration on an isotonic, multiset, multirepetition exercise bout typical of resistance exercise training. Further, no investigations document the effect of hypohydration on the ability of the central nervous system to stimulate the musculature, despite numerous scientists suggesting this possibility. The purposes of this study were to examine the isolated effect of hydration state on 1) strength, power, and the performance of acute resistance exercise, and 2) central activation ratio (CAR). METHODS: Seven healthy resistance-trained males (age = 23 +/- 4 yr, body mass = 87.8 +/- 6.8 kg, body fat = 11.5 +/- 5.2%) completed three resistance exercise bouts in different hydration states: euhydrated (EU), hypohydrated by approximately 2.5% body mass (HY25), and hypohydrated by approximately 5.0% body mass (HY50). Investigators manipulated hydration status via exercise-heat stress and controlled fluid intake 1 d preceding testing. RESULTS: Body mass decreased 2.4 +/- 0.4 and 4.8 +/- 0.4% during HY25 and HY50, respectively. No significant differences existed among trials in vertical jump height, peak lower-body power (assessed via jump squat), or peak lower-body force (assessed via isometric back squat). CAR tended to decrease as hypohydration increased (EU = 95.6 +/- 4.9%, HY25 = 94.0 +/- 3.1%, HY50 = 92.5 +/- 5.1%; P = 0.075, eta(p)(2) = 0.41). When evaluated as a function of the percentage of total work completed during a six-set back squat protocol, hypohydration significantly decreased resistance exercise performance during sets 2-3 and 2-5 for HY25 and HY50, respectively. CONCLUSION: These data indicate that hypohydration attenuates resistance exercise performance; the role of central drive as the causative mechanism driving these responses merits further research. SN - 0195-9131 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17909410/Effect_of_hydration_state_on_strength_power_and_resistance_exercise_performance_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1249/mss.0b013e3180de5f22 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -