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Beliefs about medicines and self-reported adherence among pharmacy clients.
Patient Educ Couns. 2007 Dec; 69(1-3):158-64.PE

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To analyse any association between general beliefs about medicines and self-reported adherence among pharmacy clients. Further, to examine general beliefs about medicines by background variables.

METHODS

The data were collected by questionnaires including the general section of the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire (BMQ), the self-reporting Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS) and the following background variables: gender, age, education, country of birth and medicine use. The General BMQ measures beliefs about medicines as something harmful (General-Harm), beneficial (General-Benefit) and beliefs about how doctors prescribe medicines (General-Overuse).

RESULTS

Of the 324 participating pharmacy clients, 54% were considered non-adherent. An association was found between General-Harm and adherence. Adherent behaviour and higher level of education were associated respectively with more beneficial and less harmful beliefs about medicines. Those born in the Nordic countries regarded medicines as more beneficial. Current users of herbal medicines and non-users of medicines were more likely to believe that doctors overprescribed medicines.

CONCLUSIONS

General-Harm was associated with adherence to medication among Swedish pharmacy clients. Country of birth, education and medicine use influenced beliefs about medicines.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS

Increased awareness of the patient's beliefs about medicines is needed among healthcare providers. We should encourage patients to express their views about medicines in order to optimize and personalize the information process. This can stimulate concordance and adherence to medication.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Göteborg University, Box 453, SE-405 30 Göteborg, Sweden. ann-charlotte.mardby@gu.seNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17913439

Citation

Mårdby, Ann-Charlotte, et al. "Beliefs About Medicines and Self-reported Adherence Among Pharmacy Clients." Patient Education and Counseling, vol. 69, no. 1-3, 2007, pp. 158-64.
Mårdby AC, Akerlind I, Jörgensen T. Beliefs about medicines and self-reported adherence among pharmacy clients. Patient Educ Couns. 2007;69(1-3):158-64.
Mårdby, A. C., Akerlind, I., & Jörgensen, T. (2007). Beliefs about medicines and self-reported adherence among pharmacy clients. Patient Education and Counseling, 69(1-3), 158-64.
Mårdby AC, Akerlind I, Jörgensen T. Beliefs About Medicines and Self-reported Adherence Among Pharmacy Clients. Patient Educ Couns. 2007;69(1-3):158-64. PubMed PMID: 17913439.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Beliefs about medicines and self-reported adherence among pharmacy clients. AU - Mårdby,Ann-Charlotte, AU - Akerlind,Ingemar, AU - Jörgensen,Tove, Y1 - 2007/10/29/ PY - 2007/01/25/received PY - 2007/06/29/revised PY - 2007/08/23/accepted PY - 2007/10/5/pubmed PY - 2008/2/20/medline PY - 2007/10/5/entrez SP - 158 EP - 64 JF - Patient education and counseling JO - Patient Educ Couns VL - 69 IS - 1-3 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To analyse any association between general beliefs about medicines and self-reported adherence among pharmacy clients. Further, to examine general beliefs about medicines by background variables. METHODS: The data were collected by questionnaires including the general section of the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire (BMQ), the self-reporting Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS) and the following background variables: gender, age, education, country of birth and medicine use. The General BMQ measures beliefs about medicines as something harmful (General-Harm), beneficial (General-Benefit) and beliefs about how doctors prescribe medicines (General-Overuse). RESULTS: Of the 324 participating pharmacy clients, 54% were considered non-adherent. An association was found between General-Harm and adherence. Adherent behaviour and higher level of education were associated respectively with more beneficial and less harmful beliefs about medicines. Those born in the Nordic countries regarded medicines as more beneficial. Current users of herbal medicines and non-users of medicines were more likely to believe that doctors overprescribed medicines. CONCLUSIONS: General-Harm was associated with adherence to medication among Swedish pharmacy clients. Country of birth, education and medicine use influenced beliefs about medicines. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Increased awareness of the patient's beliefs about medicines is needed among healthcare providers. We should encourage patients to express their views about medicines in order to optimize and personalize the information process. This can stimulate concordance and adherence to medication. SN - 0738-3991 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17913439/Beliefs_about_medicines_and_self_reported_adherence_among_pharmacy_clients_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0738-3991(07)00336-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -