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The effect of consuming instant black tea on postprandial plasma glucose and insulin concentrations in healthy humans.
J Am Coll Nutr 2007; 26(5):471-7JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the effects of black tea on postprandial plasma glucose and insulin concentrations in healthy humans in response to an oral glucose load.

METHODS

A four-way randomised, crossover trial was designed in which 16 healthy fasted subjects would consume 75g of glucose in either 250ml of water (control), 250ml of water plus 0.052g of caffeine (positive control) or 250 ml of water plus 1.0g or 3.0g of instant black tea. Blood samples were collected at fasting and at 30min intervals for 150min from commencement of drink ingestion. Glucose and insulin concentrations were measured using standard methodology. The tea was chemically characterised using colorimetric and HPLC methods.

RESULTS

Chemical analysis showed that the tea was rich in polyphenolic compounds (total, 350mg/g). Results from only 3 treatment arms are reported because the 3.0g tea drink caused gastrointestinal symptoms. Plasma glucose concentrations <60min in response to the drinks were similar, but were significantly reduced at 120min (P<0.01), following ingestion of the 1.0g tea drink, relative to the control and caffeine drinks. Tea consumption resulted in elevated insulin concentrations compared with the control and caffeine drinks at 90min (P<0.01) and compared with caffeine drink alone at 150min (P<0.01).

CONCLUSIONS

The 1.0g tea drink reduced the late phase plasma glucose response in healthy humans with a corresponding increase in insulin. This may indicate that the attenuation in postprandial glycemia was achieved as a result of an elevated insulin response following stimulation of pancreatic beta-cells. This effect may be attributable to the presence of phenolic compounds in the tea.

Authors+Show Affiliations

King's College London, School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Nutritional Sciences Division, Biopolymers Group, Franklin-Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford Street, London SE1 9NN, United Kingdom.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17914136

Citation

Bryans, Judith A., et al. "The Effect of Consuming Instant Black Tea On Postprandial Plasma Glucose and Insulin Concentrations in Healthy Humans." Journal of the American College of Nutrition, vol. 26, no. 5, 2007, pp. 471-7.
Bryans JA, Judd PA, Ellis PR. The effect of consuming instant black tea on postprandial plasma glucose and insulin concentrations in healthy humans. J Am Coll Nutr. 2007;26(5):471-7.
Bryans, J. A., Judd, P. A., & Ellis, P. R. (2007). The effect of consuming instant black tea on postprandial plasma glucose and insulin concentrations in healthy humans. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 26(5), pp. 471-7.
Bryans JA, Judd PA, Ellis PR. The Effect of Consuming Instant Black Tea On Postprandial Plasma Glucose and Insulin Concentrations in Healthy Humans. J Am Coll Nutr. 2007;26(5):471-7. PubMed PMID: 17914136.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The effect of consuming instant black tea on postprandial plasma glucose and insulin concentrations in healthy humans. AU - Bryans,Judith A, AU - Judd,Patricia A, AU - Ellis,Peter R, PY - 2007/10/5/pubmed PY - 2007/12/7/medline PY - 2007/10/5/entrez SP - 471 EP - 7 JF - Journal of the American College of Nutrition JO - J Am Coll Nutr VL - 26 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of black tea on postprandial plasma glucose and insulin concentrations in healthy humans in response to an oral glucose load. METHODS: A four-way randomised, crossover trial was designed in which 16 healthy fasted subjects would consume 75g of glucose in either 250ml of water (control), 250ml of water plus 0.052g of caffeine (positive control) or 250 ml of water plus 1.0g or 3.0g of instant black tea. Blood samples were collected at fasting and at 30min intervals for 150min from commencement of drink ingestion. Glucose and insulin concentrations were measured using standard methodology. The tea was chemically characterised using colorimetric and HPLC methods. RESULTS: Chemical analysis showed that the tea was rich in polyphenolic compounds (total, 350mg/g). Results from only 3 treatment arms are reported because the 3.0g tea drink caused gastrointestinal symptoms. Plasma glucose concentrations <60min in response to the drinks were similar, but were significantly reduced at 120min (P<0.01), following ingestion of the 1.0g tea drink, relative to the control and caffeine drinks. Tea consumption resulted in elevated insulin concentrations compared with the control and caffeine drinks at 90min (P<0.01) and compared with caffeine drink alone at 150min (P<0.01). CONCLUSIONS: The 1.0g tea drink reduced the late phase plasma glucose response in healthy humans with a corresponding increase in insulin. This may indicate that the attenuation in postprandial glycemia was achieved as a result of an elevated insulin response following stimulation of pancreatic beta-cells. This effect may be attributable to the presence of phenolic compounds in the tea. SN - 0731-5724 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17914136/The_effect_of_consuming_instant_black_tea_on_postprandial_plasma_glucose_and_insulin_concentrations_in_healthy_humans_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07315724.2007.10719638 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -