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Association of body mass index with heartburn, regurgitation and esophagitis: results of the Progression of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease study.
J Gastroenterol Hepatol 2007; 22(11):1728-31JG

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Overweight and obesity are believed to be risk factors for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The aim of the present study was to analyze the impact of body mass index (BMI) on the severity and frequency of reflux symptoms and esophagitis in a large cohort of reflux patients.

METHODS

As part of the Progression of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (ProGERD) study, 6215 patients with clinically assessed GERD were included in the present investigation (53% male, 52 +/- 14 years; 47% female, 56 +/- 14 years). Heartburn and regurgitation symptoms were assessed using the validated Reflux Disease Questionnaire. Endoscopies were performed and patients were subsequently classified as having non-erosive or erosive disease. To examine the association between BMI, GERD symptoms, and esophagitis, odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were calculated using logistic regression models.

RESULTS

In patients with GERD, higher BMI was associated with more frequent and more severe heartburn and regurgitation, as well as with esophagitis. The effects were more pronounced for regurgitation than for heartburn. The strongest association was between obesity and severity of regurgitation symptoms (women: OR 2.11, 95%CI 1.60-2.77; men: OR 2.15, 95%CI 1.59-2.90). Obese women, but not men, had an increased risk of severe esophagitis compared to women with normal weight (OR 2.51, 95%CI 1.53-4.12).

CONCLUSIONS

In patients with GERD, higher BMI was associated with more severe and more frequent reflux symptoms and esophagitis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute for Social Medicine, Epidemiology, and Health Economics, Charité University Medical Center, Berlin, Germany. marc.nocon@charite.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17914941

Citation

Nocon, Marc, et al. "Association of Body Mass Index With Heartburn, Regurgitation and Esophagitis: Results of the Progression of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Study." Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, vol. 22, no. 11, 2007, pp. 1728-31.
Nocon M, Labenz J, Jaspersen D, et al. Association of body mass index with heartburn, regurgitation and esophagitis: results of the Progression of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease study. J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2007;22(11):1728-31.
Nocon, M., Labenz, J., Jaspersen, D., Meyer-Sabellek, W., Stolte, M., Lind, T., ... Willich, S. N. (2007). Association of body mass index with heartburn, regurgitation and esophagitis: results of the Progression of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease study. Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 22(11), pp. 1728-31.
Nocon M, et al. Association of Body Mass Index With Heartburn, Regurgitation and Esophagitis: Results of the Progression of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Study. J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2007;22(11):1728-31. PubMed PMID: 17914941.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association of body mass index with heartburn, regurgitation and esophagitis: results of the Progression of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease study. AU - Nocon,Marc, AU - Labenz,Joachim, AU - Jaspersen,Daniel, AU - Meyer-Sabellek,Wolfgang, AU - Stolte,Manfred, AU - Lind,Tore, AU - Malfertheiner,Peter, AU - Willich,Stefan N, PY - 2007/10/5/pubmed PY - 2008/1/19/medline PY - 2007/10/5/entrez SP - 1728 EP - 31 JF - Journal of gastroenterology and hepatology JO - J. Gastroenterol. Hepatol. VL - 22 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: Overweight and obesity are believed to be risk factors for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The aim of the present study was to analyze the impact of body mass index (BMI) on the severity and frequency of reflux symptoms and esophagitis in a large cohort of reflux patients. METHODS: As part of the Progression of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (ProGERD) study, 6215 patients with clinically assessed GERD were included in the present investigation (53% male, 52 +/- 14 years; 47% female, 56 +/- 14 years). Heartburn and regurgitation symptoms were assessed using the validated Reflux Disease Questionnaire. Endoscopies were performed and patients were subsequently classified as having non-erosive or erosive disease. To examine the association between BMI, GERD symptoms, and esophagitis, odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were calculated using logistic regression models. RESULTS: In patients with GERD, higher BMI was associated with more frequent and more severe heartburn and regurgitation, as well as with esophagitis. The effects were more pronounced for regurgitation than for heartburn. The strongest association was between obesity and severity of regurgitation symptoms (women: OR 2.11, 95%CI 1.60-2.77; men: OR 2.15, 95%CI 1.59-2.90). Obese women, but not men, had an increased risk of severe esophagitis compared to women with normal weight (OR 2.51, 95%CI 1.53-4.12). CONCLUSIONS: In patients with GERD, higher BMI was associated with more severe and more frequent reflux symptoms and esophagitis. SN - 0815-9319 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17914941/Association_of_body_mass_index_with_heartburn_regurgitation_and_esophagitis:_results_of_the_Progression_of_Gastroesophageal_Reflux_Disease_study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-1746.2006.04549.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -