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A retrospective evaluation of the use of gabapentin and pregabalin in patients with postherpetic neuralgia in usual-care settings.
Clin Ther. 2007 Aug; 29(8):1655-70.CT

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Both gabapentin and pregabalin are approved for the management of postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), although dosing and pharmacokinetic differences between these medications may affect their use in actual practice.

OBJECTIVES

This study was conducted to characterize the use of gabapentin and pregabalin in the management of PHN in clinical practice, with a specific focus on the doses actually prescribed and changes in the use of other neuropathic pain-related medications after the initiation of gabapentin or pregabalin.

METHODS

The PharMetrics Patient-Centric Database was used to identify patients with PHN who were newly prescribed gabapentin or pregabalin between September 1, 2005, and March 31, 2006. The out-comes of interest were the prevalence of comorbidities, exposure to neuropathic pain-related medications (ie, the proportions of patients receiving >or=1 prescription for these medications in the 6-month periods before and after the date of the first gabapentin or pregabalin prescription), and attainment of therapeutic dose levels (gabapentin, >or=1800 mg/d; pregabalin, >or=150 mg/d).

RESULTS

The database search identified 151 patients with PHN who were newly prescribed gabapentin (57.0% female; mean [SD] age, 55.8 [11.3] years) and 100 patients who were newly prescribed pregabalin (62.0% female; mean age, 52.8 [9.4] years). The prevalence of comorbidities did not differ significantly between recipients of prescriptions for gabapentin or pregabalin, with the exception of hyperlipidemia, which was more prevalent in those prescribed gabapentin (33.8% vs 22.0%, respectively; P = 0.044), and depression, which was more prevalent in those prescribed pregabalin (12.0% vs 4.6%, respectively; P = 0.031). In the pretreatment period, those who were prescribed pregabalin had significantly greater use of long-acting opioids (P = 0.005), anticonvulsants (P < 0.001), selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (P < 0.001), and the lidocaine 5% patch (P = 0.005) compared with those prescribed gabapentin. Use of any opioid increased from pretreatment to follow-up in those prescribed gabapentin, significantly so in those who received >or=2 opioid prescriptions (P = 0.016). Use of any opioid decreased significantly from pre-treatment to follow-up in those prescribed pregabalin (P = 0.005), particularly in those who received >or=2 opioid prescriptions (P = 0.004). Tramadol use decreased significantly in those prescribed gabapentin (P = 0.045), and anticonvulsant use decreased significantly in those prescribed pregabalin (P = 0.004). Among patients prescribed gabapentin or pregabalin who received 1 prescription, 2 consecutive prescriptions, and >or=3 consecutive prescriptions, a greater proportion of those prescribed pregabalin attained therapeutic dose levels by their first, second, and third consecutive prescriptions compared with those prescribed gabapentin (69.0% vs 3.5%, respectively [P < 0.001]; 71.4% vs 21.7% [P < 0.001]; and 89.3% vs 46.2% [P < 0.001], respectively).

CONCLUSIONS

In these patients with PHN in the usual-care setting, opioid use increased after the initiation of gabapentin and decreased after the initiation of pregabalin. Few of those prescribed gabapentin received a prescription for a therapeutic dose, whereas a greater proportion of patients who were prescribed pregabalin received a prescription for a therapeutic dose.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Avalon Health Solutions, inc., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19102, USA. mgore@avalonhealthsolutions.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Evaluation Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17919547

Citation

Gore, Mugdha, et al. "A Retrospective Evaluation of the Use of Gabapentin and Pregabalin in Patients With Postherpetic Neuralgia in Usual-care Settings." Clinical Therapeutics, vol. 29, no. 8, 2007, pp. 1655-70.
Gore M, Sadosky A, Tai KS, et al. A retrospective evaluation of the use of gabapentin and pregabalin in patients with postherpetic neuralgia in usual-care settings. Clin Ther. 2007;29(8):1655-70.
Gore, M., Sadosky, A., Tai, K. S., & Stacey, B. (2007). A retrospective evaluation of the use of gabapentin and pregabalin in patients with postherpetic neuralgia in usual-care settings. Clinical Therapeutics, 29(8), 1655-70.
Gore M, et al. A Retrospective Evaluation of the Use of Gabapentin and Pregabalin in Patients With Postherpetic Neuralgia in Usual-care Settings. Clin Ther. 2007;29(8):1655-70. PubMed PMID: 17919547.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A retrospective evaluation of the use of gabapentin and pregabalin in patients with postherpetic neuralgia in usual-care settings. AU - Gore,Mugdha, AU - Sadosky,Alesia, AU - Tai,Kei-Sing, AU - Stacey,Brett, PY - 2007/07/03/accepted PY - 2007/10/9/pubmed PY - 2007/12/7/medline PY - 2007/10/9/entrez SP - 1655 EP - 70 JF - Clinical therapeutics JO - Clin Ther VL - 29 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: Both gabapentin and pregabalin are approved for the management of postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), although dosing and pharmacokinetic differences between these medications may affect their use in actual practice. OBJECTIVES: This study was conducted to characterize the use of gabapentin and pregabalin in the management of PHN in clinical practice, with a specific focus on the doses actually prescribed and changes in the use of other neuropathic pain-related medications after the initiation of gabapentin or pregabalin. METHODS: The PharMetrics Patient-Centric Database was used to identify patients with PHN who were newly prescribed gabapentin or pregabalin between September 1, 2005, and March 31, 2006. The out-comes of interest were the prevalence of comorbidities, exposure to neuropathic pain-related medications (ie, the proportions of patients receiving >or=1 prescription for these medications in the 6-month periods before and after the date of the first gabapentin or pregabalin prescription), and attainment of therapeutic dose levels (gabapentin, >or=1800 mg/d; pregabalin, >or=150 mg/d). RESULTS: The database search identified 151 patients with PHN who were newly prescribed gabapentin (57.0% female; mean [SD] age, 55.8 [11.3] years) and 100 patients who were newly prescribed pregabalin (62.0% female; mean age, 52.8 [9.4] years). The prevalence of comorbidities did not differ significantly between recipients of prescriptions for gabapentin or pregabalin, with the exception of hyperlipidemia, which was more prevalent in those prescribed gabapentin (33.8% vs 22.0%, respectively; P = 0.044), and depression, which was more prevalent in those prescribed pregabalin (12.0% vs 4.6%, respectively; P = 0.031). In the pretreatment period, those who were prescribed pregabalin had significantly greater use of long-acting opioids (P = 0.005), anticonvulsants (P < 0.001), selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (P < 0.001), and the lidocaine 5% patch (P = 0.005) compared with those prescribed gabapentin. Use of any opioid increased from pretreatment to follow-up in those prescribed gabapentin, significantly so in those who received >or=2 opioid prescriptions (P = 0.016). Use of any opioid decreased significantly from pre-treatment to follow-up in those prescribed pregabalin (P = 0.005), particularly in those who received >or=2 opioid prescriptions (P = 0.004). Tramadol use decreased significantly in those prescribed gabapentin (P = 0.045), and anticonvulsant use decreased significantly in those prescribed pregabalin (P = 0.004). Among patients prescribed gabapentin or pregabalin who received 1 prescription, 2 consecutive prescriptions, and >or=3 consecutive prescriptions, a greater proportion of those prescribed pregabalin attained therapeutic dose levels by their first, second, and third consecutive prescriptions compared with those prescribed gabapentin (69.0% vs 3.5%, respectively [P < 0.001]; 71.4% vs 21.7% [P < 0.001]; and 89.3% vs 46.2% [P < 0.001], respectively). CONCLUSIONS: In these patients with PHN in the usual-care setting, opioid use increased after the initiation of gabapentin and decreased after the initiation of pregabalin. Few of those prescribed gabapentin received a prescription for a therapeutic dose, whereas a greater proportion of patients who were prescribed pregabalin received a prescription for a therapeutic dose. SN - 0149-2918 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17919547/A_retrospective_evaluation_of_the_use_of_gabapentin_and_pregabalin_in_patients_with_postherpetic_neuralgia_in_usual_care_settings_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0149-2918(07)00254-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -