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Conscious and unconscious proportion effects in masked priming.
Conscious Cogn 2008; 17(4):1345-58CC

Abstract

The global neuronal workspace theory [Dehaene, S., & Naccache, L. (2001). Towards a cognitive neuroscience of consciousness: basic evidence and a workspace framework. Cognition, 79, 1-37.] proposes that it is impossible for an unconscious stimulus to be used strategically to enhance task performance (bottom-up effect), while a fully consciously perceived stimulus can be used to improve task performance (top-down effect). Two experiments were designed to investigate these hypotheses. In a first experiment we investigated whether a manipulation of the proportion of Arabic/number word targets had a top-down effect. Since the subjects were fully aware of the target, we expected that this manipulation could be used to enhance task performance. In a second experiment we determined whether a manipulation of the proportion of Arabic/number word primes had a bottom-up effect. Since the subjects were unaware of the prime, we hypothesized that they would be unable to use the manipulation to enhance task performance and therefore the manipulation would have no effect. Both hypotheses were largely confirmed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Leuven Campus Kortrijk, E. Sabbelaan 53, 8500 Kortrijk, Belgium. Eva.Vandenbussche@kuleuven-kortrijk.beNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17919924

Citation

Van den Bussche, Eva, et al. "Conscious and Unconscious Proportion Effects in Masked Priming." Consciousness and Cognition, vol. 17, no. 4, 2008, pp. 1345-58.
Van den Bussche E, Segers G, Reynvoet B. Conscious and unconscious proportion effects in masked priming. Conscious Cogn. 2008;17(4):1345-58.
Van den Bussche, E., Segers, G., & Reynvoet, B. (2008). Conscious and unconscious proportion effects in masked priming. Consciousness and Cognition, 17(4), pp. 1345-58.
Van den Bussche E, Segers G, Reynvoet B. Conscious and Unconscious Proportion Effects in Masked Priming. Conscious Cogn. 2008;17(4):1345-58. PubMed PMID: 17919924.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Conscious and unconscious proportion effects in masked priming. AU - Van den Bussche,Eva, AU - Segers,Gitte, AU - Reynvoet,Bert, Y1 - 2007/10/04/ PY - 2007/04/05/received PY - 2007/07/31/revised PY - 2007/08/17/accepted PY - 2007/10/9/pubmed PY - 2009/3/6/medline PY - 2007/10/9/entrez SP - 1345 EP - 58 JF - Consciousness and cognition JO - Conscious Cogn VL - 17 IS - 4 N2 - The global neuronal workspace theory [Dehaene, S., & Naccache, L. (2001). Towards a cognitive neuroscience of consciousness: basic evidence and a workspace framework. Cognition, 79, 1-37.] proposes that it is impossible for an unconscious stimulus to be used strategically to enhance task performance (bottom-up effect), while a fully consciously perceived stimulus can be used to improve task performance (top-down effect). Two experiments were designed to investigate these hypotheses. In a first experiment we investigated whether a manipulation of the proportion of Arabic/number word targets had a top-down effect. Since the subjects were fully aware of the target, we expected that this manipulation could be used to enhance task performance. In a second experiment we determined whether a manipulation of the proportion of Arabic/number word primes had a bottom-up effect. Since the subjects were unaware of the prime, we hypothesized that they would be unable to use the manipulation to enhance task performance and therefore the manipulation would have no effect. Both hypotheses were largely confirmed. SN - 1090-2376 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17919924/Conscious_and_unconscious_proportion_effects_in_masked_priming_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1053-8100(07)00089-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -