Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Behavioral avoidance and self-reported fainting symptoms in blood/injury fearful individuals: an experimental test of disgust domain specificity.
J Anxiety Disord. 2008 Jun; 22(5):837-48.JA

Abstract

This study examined the specificity of disgust in predicting avoidance in blood/injury (BI) phobia. Participants high (n=38) and low (n=46) in BI fear completed measures of disgust across multiple domains and severity of BI-related fear. They then completed three randomly presented behavioral avoidance tasks (BATs) that consisted of exposure to a 15'' severed deer leg (BI task), a live spider (spider task), and a 'contaminated' cookie (cookie task). Fainting symptoms associated with each BAT were recorded as well. When controlling for gender and BI fear group membership, mutilation disgust contributed unique variance to avoidance on the BI task and animal disgust contributed unique variance to avoidance on the spider task. None of the disgust domains contributed unique variance to avoidance on the cookie task. For the high BI fear group, self-reported fainting symptoms were more pronounced during the BI and spider BAT than during the cookie BAT. Although mutilation disgust was significantly associated with self-reported fainting symptoms on the BI task among the high BI fear group, this relationship became nonsignificant when controlling for BI-related fear severity. Implications of the domain specificity of disgust and its relevance for understanding fainting responses in BI phobia are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37203, USA. olubunmi.o.olatunji@vanderbilt.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17920808

Citation

Olatunji, Bunmi O., et al. "Behavioral Avoidance and Self-reported Fainting Symptoms in Blood/injury Fearful Individuals: an Experimental Test of Disgust Domain Specificity." Journal of Anxiety Disorders, vol. 22, no. 5, 2008, pp. 837-48.
Olatunji BO, Connolly KM, David B. Behavioral avoidance and self-reported fainting symptoms in blood/injury fearful individuals: an experimental test of disgust domain specificity. J Anxiety Disord. 2008;22(5):837-48.
Olatunji, B. O., Connolly, K. M., & David, B. (2008). Behavioral avoidance and self-reported fainting symptoms in blood/injury fearful individuals: an experimental test of disgust domain specificity. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 22(5), 837-48.
Olatunji BO, Connolly KM, David B. Behavioral Avoidance and Self-reported Fainting Symptoms in Blood/injury Fearful Individuals: an Experimental Test of Disgust Domain Specificity. J Anxiety Disord. 2008;22(5):837-48. PubMed PMID: 17920808.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Behavioral avoidance and self-reported fainting symptoms in blood/injury fearful individuals: an experimental test of disgust domain specificity. AU - Olatunji,Bunmi O, AU - Connolly,Kevin M, AU - David,Bieke, Y1 - 2007/09/01/ PY - 2007/07/17/received PY - 2007/08/29/revised PY - 2007/08/29/accepted PY - 2007/10/9/pubmed PY - 2008/9/4/medline PY - 2007/10/9/entrez SP - 837 EP - 48 JF - Journal of anxiety disorders JO - J Anxiety Disord VL - 22 IS - 5 N2 - This study examined the specificity of disgust in predicting avoidance in blood/injury (BI) phobia. Participants high (n=38) and low (n=46) in BI fear completed measures of disgust across multiple domains and severity of BI-related fear. They then completed three randomly presented behavioral avoidance tasks (BATs) that consisted of exposure to a 15'' severed deer leg (BI task), a live spider (spider task), and a 'contaminated' cookie (cookie task). Fainting symptoms associated with each BAT were recorded as well. When controlling for gender and BI fear group membership, mutilation disgust contributed unique variance to avoidance on the BI task and animal disgust contributed unique variance to avoidance on the spider task. None of the disgust domains contributed unique variance to avoidance on the cookie task. For the high BI fear group, self-reported fainting symptoms were more pronounced during the BI and spider BAT than during the cookie BAT. Although mutilation disgust was significantly associated with self-reported fainting symptoms on the BI task among the high BI fear group, this relationship became nonsignificant when controlling for BI-related fear severity. Implications of the domain specificity of disgust and its relevance for understanding fainting responses in BI phobia are discussed. SN - 0887-6185 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17920808/Behavioral_avoidance_and_self_reported_fainting_symptoms_in_blood/injury_fearful_individuals:_an_experimental_test_of_disgust_domain_specificity_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -