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Anaemia is common and predicts mortality in diabetic nephropathy.
QJM. 2007 Oct; 100(10):641-7.QJM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Diabetes is the single largest cause of chronic renal failure, accounting for 18% of patients on renal replacement therapy in the UK.

AIM

To investigate the chronic kidney disease stage at which patients with diabetic nephropathy are referred to renal services, determine the prevalence of anaemia in patients with diabetic nephropathy, examine patient outcome and identity prognostic factors.

DESIGN

Retrospective review.

METHODS

Patients with diabetic nephropathy referred to our renal services between 1989 and 2004 were identified from electronic records. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (calculated using the MDRD formula) and haemoglobin at referral were collected. Times to renal replacement therapy and death were noted.

RESULTS

We identified 508 patients. At referral, mean eGFR was 34 ml/min/1.73 m(2) and 48% of patients were at CKD stages 4 and 5. Mean haemoglobin was 11.7 g/dl; 21% had a haemoglobin <10 g/dl at referral. Median survival was 37.9 months (95%CI 33.2-42.6); median survival independent of renal replacement therapy (RRT) was 21 months (95%CI 17.8-24.6). Of patients starting RRT, 38% did so within 1 year of referral. Older age (RR 1.02, 95%CI 1.01-1.04) and lower haemoglobin (RR 0.9, 95%CI 0.85-0.99) at referral predicted death on multivariate analysis.

DISCUSSION

At referral to renal services, almost 50% of patients with diabetic nephropathy were at CKD stages 4 and 5. Anaemia was common and predicted mortality. All diabetic patients from CKD stage 3 should be screened for anaemia. We believe that patients with diabetic nephropathy should be discussed with renal services when they reach CKD stage 3 with evidence of progression of renal disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Renal Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Castle Street, Glasgow G4 0SF, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17921197

Citation

Joss, N, et al. "Anaemia Is Common and Predicts Mortality in Diabetic Nephropathy." QJM : Monthly Journal of the Association of Physicians, vol. 100, no. 10, 2007, pp. 641-7.
Joss N, Patel R, Paterson K, et al. Anaemia is common and predicts mortality in diabetic nephropathy. QJM. 2007;100(10):641-7.
Joss, N., Patel, R., Paterson, K., Simpson, K., Perry, C., & Stirling, C. (2007). Anaemia is common and predicts mortality in diabetic nephropathy. QJM : Monthly Journal of the Association of Physicians, 100(10), 641-7.
Joss N, et al. Anaemia Is Common and Predicts Mortality in Diabetic Nephropathy. QJM. 2007;100(10):641-7. PubMed PMID: 17921197.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Anaemia is common and predicts mortality in diabetic nephropathy. AU - Joss,N, AU - Patel,R, AU - Paterson,K, AU - Simpson,K, AU - Perry,C, AU - Stirling,C, PY - 2007/10/9/pubmed PY - 2008/4/11/medline PY - 2007/10/9/entrez SP - 641 EP - 7 JF - QJM : monthly journal of the Association of Physicians JO - QJM VL - 100 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: Diabetes is the single largest cause of chronic renal failure, accounting for 18% of patients on renal replacement therapy in the UK. AIM: To investigate the chronic kidney disease stage at which patients with diabetic nephropathy are referred to renal services, determine the prevalence of anaemia in patients with diabetic nephropathy, examine patient outcome and identity prognostic factors. DESIGN: Retrospective review. METHODS: Patients with diabetic nephropathy referred to our renal services between 1989 and 2004 were identified from electronic records. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (calculated using the MDRD formula) and haemoglobin at referral were collected. Times to renal replacement therapy and death were noted. RESULTS: We identified 508 patients. At referral, mean eGFR was 34 ml/min/1.73 m(2) and 48% of patients were at CKD stages 4 and 5. Mean haemoglobin was 11.7 g/dl; 21% had a haemoglobin <10 g/dl at referral. Median survival was 37.9 months (95%CI 33.2-42.6); median survival independent of renal replacement therapy (RRT) was 21 months (95%CI 17.8-24.6). Of patients starting RRT, 38% did so within 1 year of referral. Older age (RR 1.02, 95%CI 1.01-1.04) and lower haemoglobin (RR 0.9, 95%CI 0.85-0.99) at referral predicted death on multivariate analysis. DISCUSSION: At referral to renal services, almost 50% of patients with diabetic nephropathy were at CKD stages 4 and 5. Anaemia was common and predicted mortality. All diabetic patients from CKD stage 3 should be screened for anaemia. We believe that patients with diabetic nephropathy should be discussed with renal services when they reach CKD stage 3 with evidence of progression of renal disease. SN - 1460-2725 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17921197/Anaemia_is_common_and_predicts_mortality_in_diabetic_nephropathy_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/qjmed/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/qjmed/hcm080 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -