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The metabolic syndrome in adults prenatally exposed to the Dutch famine.
Am J Clin Nutr 2007; 86(4):1219-24AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Epidemiologic studies have shown that the metabolic syndrome may originate in utero.

OBJECTIVE

We aimed to determine whether exposure to prenatal famine is associated with a greater prevalence of the metabolic syndrome.

DESIGN

We assessed the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome according to the National Cholesterol Education Program definition in 783 members of the Dutch Famine Birth Cohort. Participants were born as term singletons around the time of the 1944-1945 Dutch famine.

RESULTS

Exposure to famine during gestation was not significantly associated with the metabolic syndrome (odds ratio: 1.2; 95% CI: 0.9, 1.7). Birth weight also was not significantly associated with the metabolic syndrome (odds ratio: 1.3/1-kg decrease in birth weight; 95% CI: 0.9, 1.8/1-kg decrease in birth weight). Exposure to famine during gestation was associated with significantly higher triacylglycerol concentrations (0.1 g/L; 0.0, 0.2 g/L). Men exposed to famine in early gestation had significantly lower HDL-cholesterol concentrations (-0.08 mmol/L; -0.14, 0.00 mmol/L) than did unexposed men.

CONCLUSIONS

Prenatal exposure to famine or reduced birth weight is not associated with a significantly greater prevalence of the metabolic syndrome. Our findings suggest that, although elements of the metabolic syndrome may be programmed by fetal undernutrition, the origin of the syndrome as a whole is not likely to be found in poor nutrition during gestation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands. s.derooij@vumc.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17921405

Citation

de Rooij, Susanne R., et al. "The Metabolic Syndrome in Adults Prenatally Exposed to the Dutch Famine." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 86, no. 4, 2007, pp. 1219-24.
de Rooij SR, Painter RC, Holleman F, et al. The metabolic syndrome in adults prenatally exposed to the Dutch famine. Am J Clin Nutr. 2007;86(4):1219-24.
de Rooij, S. R., Painter, R. C., Holleman, F., Bossuyt, P. M., & Roseboom, T. J. (2007). The metabolic syndrome in adults prenatally exposed to the Dutch famine. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 86(4), pp. 1219-24.
de Rooij SR, et al. The Metabolic Syndrome in Adults Prenatally Exposed to the Dutch Famine. Am J Clin Nutr. 2007;86(4):1219-24. PubMed PMID: 17921405.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The metabolic syndrome in adults prenatally exposed to the Dutch famine. AU - de Rooij,Susanne R, AU - Painter,Rebecca C, AU - Holleman,Frits, AU - Bossuyt,Patrick Mm, AU - Roseboom,Tessa J, PY - 2007/10/9/pubmed PY - 2007/12/6/medline PY - 2007/10/9/entrez SP - 1219 EP - 24 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 86 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic studies have shown that the metabolic syndrome may originate in utero. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to determine whether exposure to prenatal famine is associated with a greater prevalence of the metabolic syndrome. DESIGN: We assessed the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome according to the National Cholesterol Education Program definition in 783 members of the Dutch Famine Birth Cohort. Participants were born as term singletons around the time of the 1944-1945 Dutch famine. RESULTS: Exposure to famine during gestation was not significantly associated with the metabolic syndrome (odds ratio: 1.2; 95% CI: 0.9, 1.7). Birth weight also was not significantly associated with the metabolic syndrome (odds ratio: 1.3/1-kg decrease in birth weight; 95% CI: 0.9, 1.8/1-kg decrease in birth weight). Exposure to famine during gestation was associated with significantly higher triacylglycerol concentrations (0.1 g/L; 0.0, 0.2 g/L). Men exposed to famine in early gestation had significantly lower HDL-cholesterol concentrations (-0.08 mmol/L; -0.14, 0.00 mmol/L) than did unexposed men. CONCLUSIONS: Prenatal exposure to famine or reduced birth weight is not associated with a significantly greater prevalence of the metabolic syndrome. Our findings suggest that, although elements of the metabolic syndrome may be programmed by fetal undernutrition, the origin of the syndrome as a whole is not likely to be found in poor nutrition during gestation. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17921405/The_metabolic_syndrome_in_adults_prenatally_exposed_to_the_Dutch_famine_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/86.4.1219 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -