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Home smoking bans in Finland and the association with child smoking.
Eur J Public Health. 2008 Jun; 18(3):306-11.EJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Few studies in Europe have investigated home smoking bans and their association with child smoking.

METHODS

A nationwide survey of 12 to 18-year olds in 2005 (n = 6503, response rate 66%) was used to study home smoking bans in Finland. Multinomial logistic regression analyses were used to study association of home smoking bans and child smoking.

RESULTS

Of the respondents, 58% reported a total ban, 27% a partial ban, 4% reported no ban and 10% chose the option 'I cannot say'. The lack of total ban was strongly associated with living in non-intact families, parents' lower educational level, parental smoking and parents' permissive attitude towards child smoking. Moreover, partial or no ban increased the likelihood of being a daily smoker. In the multinomial logistic regression model, the odds ratios (ORs) for children's daily smoking, adjusted for sociodemographic factors, parental smoking and their permissive attitude, were OR 2.9 [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.3-3.6] for partial ban and OR 14.3 (8.6-23.7) for no ban. In families where both parents smoked, the adjusted ORs were correspondingly 1.5 (95% CI 0.7-3.0) and 2.9 (95% CI 1.1-7.8).

CONCLUSIONS

Home smoking bans will contribute towards a reduced risk of child smoking even when parents smoke. Tobacco control legislation needs to be enhanced with measures promoting awareness of the benefits achievable through strict home smoking bans. Families characterized by lower socioeconomic status and smoking parents are particular target groups.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Tampere School of Public Health, University of Tampere, Finland. susanna.rainio@uta.fiNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17925322

Citation

Rainio, Susanna U., and Arja H. Rimpelä. "Home Smoking Bans in Finland and the Association With Child Smoking." European Journal of Public Health, vol. 18, no. 3, 2008, pp. 306-11.
Rainio SU, Rimpelä AH. Home smoking bans in Finland and the association with child smoking. Eur J Public Health. 2008;18(3):306-11.
Rainio, S. U., & Rimpelä, A. H. (2008). Home smoking bans in Finland and the association with child smoking. European Journal of Public Health, 18(3), 306-11.
Rainio SU, Rimpelä AH. Home Smoking Bans in Finland and the Association With Child Smoking. Eur J Public Health. 2008;18(3):306-11. PubMed PMID: 17925322.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Home smoking bans in Finland and the association with child smoking. AU - Rainio,Susanna U, AU - Rimpelä,Arja H, Y1 - 2007/10/09/ PY - 2007/10/11/pubmed PY - 2008/9/3/medline PY - 2007/10/11/entrez SP - 306 EP - 11 JF - European journal of public health JO - Eur J Public Health VL - 18 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Few studies in Europe have investigated home smoking bans and their association with child smoking. METHODS: A nationwide survey of 12 to 18-year olds in 2005 (n = 6503, response rate 66%) was used to study home smoking bans in Finland. Multinomial logistic regression analyses were used to study association of home smoking bans and child smoking. RESULTS: Of the respondents, 58% reported a total ban, 27% a partial ban, 4% reported no ban and 10% chose the option 'I cannot say'. The lack of total ban was strongly associated with living in non-intact families, parents' lower educational level, parental smoking and parents' permissive attitude towards child smoking. Moreover, partial or no ban increased the likelihood of being a daily smoker. In the multinomial logistic regression model, the odds ratios (ORs) for children's daily smoking, adjusted for sociodemographic factors, parental smoking and their permissive attitude, were OR 2.9 [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.3-3.6] for partial ban and OR 14.3 (8.6-23.7) for no ban. In families where both parents smoked, the adjusted ORs were correspondingly 1.5 (95% CI 0.7-3.0) and 2.9 (95% CI 1.1-7.8). CONCLUSIONS: Home smoking bans will contribute towards a reduced risk of child smoking even when parents smoke. Tobacco control legislation needs to be enhanced with measures promoting awareness of the benefits achievable through strict home smoking bans. Families characterized by lower socioeconomic status and smoking parents are particular target groups. SN - 1464-360X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17925322/Home_smoking_bans_in_Finland_and_the_association_with_child_smoking_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/eurpub/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/eurpub/ckm098 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -