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Grip strength and the risk of incident Alzheimer's disease.
Neuroepidemiology. 2007; 29(1-2):66-73.N

Abstract

Decline in strength is common in older persons but little data are available about its association with Alzheimer's disease (AD). We studied the association of level of and rate of change in strength in 877 older persons without dementia at baseline and risk of AD. In a proportional hazards model adjusted for age, sex and education, each 1-lb decrease in grip strength at baseline was associated with about a 1.5% increase in the risk of AD (HR, 0.986; 95% CI, 0.973-0.998). These results persisted even after excluding persons who developed AD in the first 5 years of follow-up. In a subsequent model examining the association of the annual rate of change in grip strength with incident AD, each 1-lb annual decline in grip strength was associated with about a 9% increase in the risk of AD (HR, 0.915; 95% CI, 0.884-0.948). Results were similar after controlling for level and rate of change in body mass index, parkinsonian signs, physical and cognitive activity, depressive symptoms, vascular diseases and risk factors, social networks and early-life socioeconomic status. Declining strength in old age is associated with an increased risk of AD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL 60612, USA. Aron_S_Buchman@rush.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17925596

Citation

Buchman, Aron S., et al. "Grip Strength and the Risk of Incident Alzheimer's Disease." Neuroepidemiology, vol. 29, no. 1-2, 2007, pp. 66-73.
Buchman AS, Wilson RS, Boyle PA, et al. Grip strength and the risk of incident Alzheimer's disease. Neuroepidemiology. 2007;29(1-2):66-73.
Buchman, A. S., Wilson, R. S., Boyle, P. A., Bienias, J. L., & Bennett, D. A. (2007). Grip strength and the risk of incident Alzheimer's disease. Neuroepidemiology, 29(1-2), 66-73.
Buchman AS, et al. Grip Strength and the Risk of Incident Alzheimer's Disease. Neuroepidemiology. 2007;29(1-2):66-73. PubMed PMID: 17925596.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Grip strength and the risk of incident Alzheimer's disease. AU - Buchman,Aron S, AU - Wilson,Robert S, AU - Boyle,Patricia A, AU - Bienias,Julia L, AU - Bennett,David A, Y1 - 2007/10/08/ PY - 2007/10/11/pubmed PY - 2008/2/6/medline PY - 2007/10/11/entrez SP - 66 EP - 73 JF - Neuroepidemiology JO - Neuroepidemiology VL - 29 IS - 1-2 N2 - Decline in strength is common in older persons but little data are available about its association with Alzheimer's disease (AD). We studied the association of level of and rate of change in strength in 877 older persons without dementia at baseline and risk of AD. In a proportional hazards model adjusted for age, sex and education, each 1-lb decrease in grip strength at baseline was associated with about a 1.5% increase in the risk of AD (HR, 0.986; 95% CI, 0.973-0.998). These results persisted even after excluding persons who developed AD in the first 5 years of follow-up. In a subsequent model examining the association of the annual rate of change in grip strength with incident AD, each 1-lb annual decline in grip strength was associated with about a 9% increase in the risk of AD (HR, 0.915; 95% CI, 0.884-0.948). Results were similar after controlling for level and rate of change in body mass index, parkinsonian signs, physical and cognitive activity, depressive symptoms, vascular diseases and risk factors, social networks and early-life socioeconomic status. Declining strength in old age is associated with an increased risk of AD. SN - 1423-0208 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17925596/Grip_strength_and_the_risk_of_incident_Alzheimer's_disease_ L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000109498 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -