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Cardiovascular event risk in relation to dietary fat intake in middle-aged individuals: data from The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study.
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil 2007; 14(5):701-6EJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND DESIGN

The hypothesis that diets rich in total and saturated fat and poor in unsaturated fats increase the risk for cardiovascular disease is still vividly debated. The aim of this study was to examine whether total fat, saturated fat, or unsaturated fat intakes are independent risk factors for cardiovascular events in a large population-based cohort.

METHODS

28 098 middle-aged individuals (61% women) participated in the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study between 1991 and 1996. In this analysis, individuals with an earlier history of cardiovascular disease were excluded. With adjustments made for confounding by age and various anthropometric, social, dietary, and life-style factors, hazard ratios (HR) were estimated for individuals categorized by quartiles of fat intake [HR (95% confidence interval, CI), Cox's regression model].

RESULTS

No trend towards higher cardiovascular event risk for women or men with higher total or saturated fat intakes, was observed. Total fat: HR (95% CI) for fourth quartile was 0.98 (0.77-1.25) for women, 1.02 (0.84-1.23) for men; saturated fat: 0.98 (0.71-1.33) for women and 1.05 (0.83-1.34) for men. Inverse associations between unsaturated fat intake and cardiovascular event risk were not observed.

CONCLUSIONS

In relation to risks of cardiovascular events, our results do not suggest any benefit from a limited total or saturated fat intake, nor from relatively high intake of unsaturated fat.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Cardiology, Lund University, University Hospital (UMAS), Malmö, Sweden. Margret.Leosdottir@med.lu.seNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17925631

Citation

Leosdottir, Margret, et al. "Cardiovascular Event Risk in Relation to Dietary Fat Intake in Middle-aged Individuals: Data From the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study." European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation : Official Journal of the European Society of Cardiology, Working Groups On Epidemiology & Prevention and Cardiac Rehabilitation and Exercise Physiology, vol. 14, no. 5, 2007, pp. 701-6.
Leosdottir M, Nilsson PM, Nilsson JA, et al. Cardiovascular event risk in relation to dietary fat intake in middle-aged individuals: data from The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study. Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2007;14(5):701-6.
Leosdottir, M., Nilsson, P. M., Nilsson, J. A., & Berglund, G. (2007). Cardiovascular event risk in relation to dietary fat intake in middle-aged individuals: data from The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study. European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation : Official Journal of the European Society of Cardiology, Working Groups On Epidemiology & Prevention and Cardiac Rehabilitation and Exercise Physiology, 14(5), pp. 701-6.
Leosdottir M, et al. Cardiovascular Event Risk in Relation to Dietary Fat Intake in Middle-aged Individuals: Data From the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study. Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2007;14(5):701-6. PubMed PMID: 17925631.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cardiovascular event risk in relation to dietary fat intake in middle-aged individuals: data from The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study. AU - Leosdottir,Margret, AU - Nilsson,Peter M, AU - Nilsson,Jan-Ake, AU - Berglund,Göran, PY - 2007/10/11/pubmed PY - 2008/2/7/medline PY - 2007/10/11/entrez SP - 701 EP - 6 JF - European journal of cardiovascular prevention and rehabilitation : official journal of the European Society of Cardiology, Working Groups on Epidemiology & Prevention and Cardiac Rehabilitation and Exercise Physiology JO - Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil VL - 14 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND AND DESIGN: The hypothesis that diets rich in total and saturated fat and poor in unsaturated fats increase the risk for cardiovascular disease is still vividly debated. The aim of this study was to examine whether total fat, saturated fat, or unsaturated fat intakes are independent risk factors for cardiovascular events in a large population-based cohort. METHODS: 28 098 middle-aged individuals (61% women) participated in the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study between 1991 and 1996. In this analysis, individuals with an earlier history of cardiovascular disease were excluded. With adjustments made for confounding by age and various anthropometric, social, dietary, and life-style factors, hazard ratios (HR) were estimated for individuals categorized by quartiles of fat intake [HR (95% confidence interval, CI), Cox's regression model]. RESULTS: No trend towards higher cardiovascular event risk for women or men with higher total or saturated fat intakes, was observed. Total fat: HR (95% CI) for fourth quartile was 0.98 (0.77-1.25) for women, 1.02 (0.84-1.23) for men; saturated fat: 0.98 (0.71-1.33) for women and 1.05 (0.83-1.34) for men. Inverse associations between unsaturated fat intake and cardiovascular event risk were not observed. CONCLUSIONS: In relation to risks of cardiovascular events, our results do not suggest any benefit from a limited total or saturated fat intake, nor from relatively high intake of unsaturated fat. SN - 1741-8267 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17925631/Cardiovascular_event_risk_in_relation_to_dietary_fat_intake_in_middle_aged_individuals:_data_from_The_Malmö_Diet_and_Cancer_Study_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=17925631.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -