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[Bullying, psychosocial health and risk behaviour in adolescence].
Gesundheitswesen. 2007 Aug-Sep; 69(8-9):475-82.G

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Bullying as a subform of aggressive behaviour has not received much attention as a specific risk behaviour in adolescence. Especially the adverse health effects in relation to bullying have been barely discussed in Germany. The objective of this study is to present age- and gender-specific prevalences in bullying and to analyse the association between the different bullying roles and subjective health as well as risk behaviour.

METHODS

Data were obtained from the German part of the international WHO collaborative study "Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC)" in 2002. Overall, 5,650 school children aged 11-15 years were interviewed with a standardised questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to analyse the association between bullying, psychosocial health and risk behaviour separately for girls and boys.

RESULTS

About 17% of the boys and 10% of the girls aged 11-15 years were classified as repeated bullying perpetrators. About 10% of the school children are victims of being bullied several times a month. Another 3-5% of the adolescents belonged to the group of simultaneous victims and perpetrators (bully-victims). Perpetrators as well as victims showed strong associations with psychosocial health and risk behaviour. Independently of gender, victims were significantly more likely to report repeated psychosomatic complaints, adverse mental health and negative self-reported health (boys only), than uninvolved students. Especially for male perpetrators, strong associations with regular tobacco and alcohol use and repeated drunkenness were found, while these behaviour types were significantly less prevalent among victims. The bully-victim group is characterised by high rates of psychosomatic complaints and mental health problems (boys only).

CONCLUSIONS

Bullying also seems to be widespread in schools in Germany and is strongly associated with subjective health and substance-related risk behaviour. The results suggest that bullying is a critical issue that requires increasing attention in health research. The unique health problems of victims and perpetrators suggest different intervention strategies for both groups.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Fakultät für Gesundheitswissenschaften, Universität Bielefeld. matthias.richter@uni-bielefeld.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article

Language

ger

PubMed ID

17926265

Citation

Richter, M, et al. "[Bullying, Psychosocial Health and Risk Behaviour in Adolescence]." Gesundheitswesen (Bundesverband Der Arzte Des Offentlichen Gesundheitsdienstes (Germany)), vol. 69, no. 8-9, 2007, pp. 475-82.
Richter M, Bowles D, Melzer W, et al. [Bullying, psychosocial health and risk behaviour in adolescence]. Gesundheitswesen. 2007;69(8-9):475-82.
Richter, M., Bowles, D., Melzer, W., & Hurrelmann, K. (2007). [Bullying, psychosocial health and risk behaviour in adolescence]. Gesundheitswesen (Bundesverband Der Arzte Des Offentlichen Gesundheitsdienstes (Germany)), 69(8-9), 475-82.
Richter M, et al. [Bullying, Psychosocial Health and Risk Behaviour in Adolescence]. Gesundheitswesen. 2007;69(8-9):475-82. PubMed PMID: 17926265.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Bullying, psychosocial health and risk behaviour in adolescence]. AU - Richter,M, AU - Bowles,D, AU - Melzer,W, AU - Hurrelmann,K, PY - 2007/10/11/pubmed PY - 2007/11/7/medline PY - 2007/10/11/entrez SP - 475 EP - 82 JF - Gesundheitswesen (Bundesverband der Arzte des Offentlichen Gesundheitsdienstes (Germany)) JO - Gesundheitswesen VL - 69 IS - 8-9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Bullying as a subform of aggressive behaviour has not received much attention as a specific risk behaviour in adolescence. Especially the adverse health effects in relation to bullying have been barely discussed in Germany. The objective of this study is to present age- and gender-specific prevalences in bullying and to analyse the association between the different bullying roles and subjective health as well as risk behaviour. METHODS: Data were obtained from the German part of the international WHO collaborative study "Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC)" in 2002. Overall, 5,650 school children aged 11-15 years were interviewed with a standardised questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to analyse the association between bullying, psychosocial health and risk behaviour separately for girls and boys. RESULTS: About 17% of the boys and 10% of the girls aged 11-15 years were classified as repeated bullying perpetrators. About 10% of the school children are victims of being bullied several times a month. Another 3-5% of the adolescents belonged to the group of simultaneous victims and perpetrators (bully-victims). Perpetrators as well as victims showed strong associations with psychosocial health and risk behaviour. Independently of gender, victims were significantly more likely to report repeated psychosomatic complaints, adverse mental health and negative self-reported health (boys only), than uninvolved students. Especially for male perpetrators, strong associations with regular tobacco and alcohol use and repeated drunkenness were found, while these behaviour types were significantly less prevalent among victims. The bully-victim group is characterised by high rates of psychosomatic complaints and mental health problems (boys only). CONCLUSIONS: Bullying also seems to be widespread in schools in Germany and is strongly associated with subjective health and substance-related risk behaviour. The results suggest that bullying is a critical issue that requires increasing attention in health research. The unique health problems of victims and perpetrators suggest different intervention strategies for both groups. SN - 1439-4421 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17926265/[Bullying_psychosocial_health_and_risk_behaviour_in_adolescence]_ L2 - http://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-2007-985876 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -