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Increasing pneumococcal vaccination in managed care through telephone outreach.
Am J Manag Care. 2007 Oct; 13(10):581-8.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To determine the effectiveness of a telephone reminder to increase pneumococcal vaccination in a population that had received mailed reminders and to evaluate whether the intervention effect is similar for clinics serving primarily non-Hispanic black or non-Hispanic white patient populations.

STUDY DESIGN

Randomized trial within a managed care network.

METHODS

All unvaccinated patients 18 years and older with chronic medical conditions and 65 years and older without chronic medical conditions (N = 6106) were randomized to receive telephone intervention or standard care and followed up for 6-month vaccination status. The intervention was a telephone call initiated by a nurse to inform patients that pneumococcal vaccination was recommended and was a covered benefit of their insurance.

RESULTS

Intervention patients were 2.3 times as likely to be vaccinated during the study period than control patients (P < .001). The success of telephone intervention versus control was similar across clinics (P = .16) and across the chronic disease and elderly groups (P = .14). In subanalyses of individuals reached by telephone intervention, unvaccinated black subjects were less likely to be vaccinated during the study than unvaccinated white subjects (34% vs 25%, P = .03). Nurse staff time for telephone intervention cost $147.35 per additional patient vaccinated.

CONCLUSIONS

Telephone intervention was successful at increasing vaccination rates in a diverse managed care population that had already received mailed reminders. Tailored messaging for pneumococcal vaccination through telephone reminders increases patient demand for vaccination and should be implemented by managed care organizations seeking to increase their vaccination rates.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From Health Services Research and Evaluation Branch, Immunization Services Division, National Immunization Program, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Ga 30333, USA. cwinston@cdc.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17927463

Citation

Winston, Carla A., et al. "Increasing Pneumococcal Vaccination in Managed Care Through Telephone Outreach." The American Journal of Managed Care, vol. 13, no. 10, 2007, pp. 581-8.
Winston CA, Mims AD, Leatherwood KA. Increasing pneumococcal vaccination in managed care through telephone outreach. Am J Manag Care. 2007;13(10):581-8.
Winston, C. A., Mims, A. D., & Leatherwood, K. A. (2007). Increasing pneumococcal vaccination in managed care through telephone outreach. The American Journal of Managed Care, 13(10), 581-8.
Winston CA, Mims AD, Leatherwood KA. Increasing Pneumococcal Vaccination in Managed Care Through Telephone Outreach. Am J Manag Care. 2007;13(10):581-8. PubMed PMID: 17927463.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Increasing pneumococcal vaccination in managed care through telephone outreach. AU - Winston,Carla A, AU - Mims,Adrienne D, AU - Leatherwood,Kecia A, PY - 2007/10/12/pubmed PY - 2007/11/13/medline PY - 2007/10/12/entrez SP - 581 EP - 8 JF - The American journal of managed care JO - Am J Manag Care VL - 13 IS - 10 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To determine the effectiveness of a telephone reminder to increase pneumococcal vaccination in a population that had received mailed reminders and to evaluate whether the intervention effect is similar for clinics serving primarily non-Hispanic black or non-Hispanic white patient populations. STUDY DESIGN: Randomized trial within a managed care network. METHODS: All unvaccinated patients 18 years and older with chronic medical conditions and 65 years and older without chronic medical conditions (N = 6106) were randomized to receive telephone intervention or standard care and followed up for 6-month vaccination status. The intervention was a telephone call initiated by a nurse to inform patients that pneumococcal vaccination was recommended and was a covered benefit of their insurance. RESULTS: Intervention patients were 2.3 times as likely to be vaccinated during the study period than control patients (P < .001). The success of telephone intervention versus control was similar across clinics (P = .16) and across the chronic disease and elderly groups (P = .14). In subanalyses of individuals reached by telephone intervention, unvaccinated black subjects were less likely to be vaccinated during the study than unvaccinated white subjects (34% vs 25%, P = .03). Nurse staff time for telephone intervention cost $147.35 per additional patient vaccinated. CONCLUSIONS: Telephone intervention was successful at increasing vaccination rates in a diverse managed care population that had already received mailed reminders. Tailored messaging for pneumococcal vaccination through telephone reminders increases patient demand for vaccination and should be implemented by managed care organizations seeking to increase their vaccination rates. SN - 1936-2692 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17927463/Increasing_pneumococcal_vaccination_in_managed_care_through_telephone_outreach_ L2 - https://www.ajmc.com/pubMed.php?pii=4382 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -