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Prevalence and significance of generalized and central body obesity in an urban Asian Indian population in Chennai, India (CURES: 47).
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2009 Feb; 63(2):259-67.EJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To determine the prevalence of generalized and abdominal obesity in urban Asian Indians and compare the association of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) with metabolic risk variables.

METHODS

Subjects were recruited from the Chennai Urban Rural Epidemiology Study (CURES) carried out between 2001 and 2004 and involved 2350/2600 eligible subjects (response rate 90.4%). Anthropometric measurements, lipids and oral glucose tolerance tests were carried out. Generalized obesity (BMI>or=23 kg m(-2)) and abdominal obesity (WC>or=90 cm in men and >or=80 cm in women) were defined using WHO Asia Pacific guidelines.

RESULTS

The age standardized prevalence of generalized obesity was 45.9% (95% CI: 43.9-47.9%), (women: 47.4%; men: 43.2%, P=0.210), while that of abdominal obesity was 46.6% (95% CI: 44.6-48.6%), (women: 56.2%> men: 35.1%, P<0.001). Area under the curve for identifying subjects with any three metabolic risk factors using BMI was 0.66, 95% CI: 0.63-0.69, P<0.001, while, for WC, it was 0.70, 95% CI: 0.66-0.74, P<0.001 for men, and 0.69, 95% CI: 0.65-0.74, P<0.001 for women. Isolated generalized obesity (normal WC, increased BMI) was present in 12.7% of men and 6.1% of women. Isolated abdominal obesity (increased WC, normal BMI) was present in 4.7% of men and 14% of women. Combined obesity was present in 32.6% of men and 43.3% of women.

CONCLUSIONS

In Asian Indians, the prevalence of combined obesity is high among both sexes, while isolated generalized obesity is more common in men and isolated abdominal obesity more common in women. However, these prevalence rates vary markedly depending on cut points used. WC is a better marker of obesity-related metabolic risk than BMI in women compared to men in this population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Madras Diabetes Research Foundation, Dr Mohan's Diabetes Specialities Centre, Chennai, India.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17928807

Citation

Deepa, M, et al. "Prevalence and Significance of Generalized and Central Body Obesity in an Urban Asian Indian Population in Chennai, India (CURES: 47)." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 63, no. 2, 2009, pp. 259-67.
Deepa M, Farooq S, Deepa R, et al. Prevalence and significance of generalized and central body obesity in an urban Asian Indian population in Chennai, India (CURES: 47). Eur J Clin Nutr. 2009;63(2):259-67.
Deepa, M., Farooq, S., Deepa, R., Manjula, D., & Mohan, V. (2009). Prevalence and significance of generalized and central body obesity in an urban Asian Indian population in Chennai, India (CURES: 47). European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 63(2), 259-67.
Deepa M, et al. Prevalence and Significance of Generalized and Central Body Obesity in an Urban Asian Indian Population in Chennai, India (CURES: 47). Eur J Clin Nutr. 2009;63(2):259-67. PubMed PMID: 17928807.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence and significance of generalized and central body obesity in an urban Asian Indian population in Chennai, India (CURES: 47). AU - Deepa,M, AU - Farooq,S, AU - Deepa,R, AU - Manjula,D, AU - Mohan,V, Y1 - 2007/10/10/ PY - 2007/10/12/pubmed PY - 2009/4/17/medline PY - 2007/10/12/entrez SP - 259 EP - 67 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 63 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of generalized and abdominal obesity in urban Asian Indians and compare the association of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) with metabolic risk variables. METHODS: Subjects were recruited from the Chennai Urban Rural Epidemiology Study (CURES) carried out between 2001 and 2004 and involved 2350/2600 eligible subjects (response rate 90.4%). Anthropometric measurements, lipids and oral glucose tolerance tests were carried out. Generalized obesity (BMI>or=23 kg m(-2)) and abdominal obesity (WC>or=90 cm in men and >or=80 cm in women) were defined using WHO Asia Pacific guidelines. RESULTS: The age standardized prevalence of generalized obesity was 45.9% (95% CI: 43.9-47.9%), (women: 47.4%; men: 43.2%, P=0.210), while that of abdominal obesity was 46.6% (95% CI: 44.6-48.6%), (women: 56.2%> men: 35.1%, P<0.001). Area under the curve for identifying subjects with any three metabolic risk factors using BMI was 0.66, 95% CI: 0.63-0.69, P<0.001, while, for WC, it was 0.70, 95% CI: 0.66-0.74, P<0.001 for men, and 0.69, 95% CI: 0.65-0.74, P<0.001 for women. Isolated generalized obesity (normal WC, increased BMI) was present in 12.7% of men and 6.1% of women. Isolated abdominal obesity (increased WC, normal BMI) was present in 4.7% of men and 14% of women. Combined obesity was present in 32.6% of men and 43.3% of women. CONCLUSIONS: In Asian Indians, the prevalence of combined obesity is high among both sexes, while isolated generalized obesity is more common in men and isolated abdominal obesity more common in women. However, these prevalence rates vary markedly depending on cut points used. WC is a better marker of obesity-related metabolic risk than BMI in women compared to men in this population. SN - 1476-5640 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17928807/Prevalence_and_significance_of_generalized_and_central_body_obesity_in_an_urban_Asian_Indian_population_in_Chennai_India__CURES:_47__ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602920 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -