Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Review article: abdominal bloating and distension in functional gastrointestinal disorders--epidemiology and exploration of possible mechanisms.
Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2008; 27(1):2-10AP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

A sensation of abdominal bloating, sometimes accompanied by an increase in girth (distension), is one of the most common and most intrusive features of functional bowel disorders.

AIM

To conduct a systematic, evidence-based review of the epidemiology and pathophysiology of abdominal bloating and its relationship to distension.

METHODS

The terms bloating, distension, functional bowel, irritable bowel syndrome, constipation and diarrhoea were searched on MEDLINE up to 2006. References from selected articles and relevant abstracts were also included.

RESULTS

Approximately 50% of irritable bowel syndrome patients with bloating also experience an increase in abdominal girth and this is more pronounced with constipation than diarrhoea. Bloating appears to be more frequently associated with visceral hypersensitivity, whereas distension is more often related to hyposensitivity and delayed transit. Although there is little evidence for excessive gas as a cause of bloating, gas infusion studies suggest that handling of gas may be impaired in irritable bowel syndrome and there may also be abnormal relaxation of the anterior abdominal musculature in these patients.

CONCLUSIONS

There is unlikely to be a single cause for bloating and distension, which probably have different, but overlapping, pathophysiological mechanisms. Relieving constipation might help distension, but the treatment of bloating may need more complex approaches involving sensory modulation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Education and Research Centre, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester, UK.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17931344

Citation

Agrawal, A, and P J. Whorwell. "Review Article: Abdominal Bloating and Distension in Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders--epidemiology and Exploration of Possible Mechanisms." Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, vol. 27, no. 1, 2008, pp. 2-10.
Agrawal A, Whorwell PJ. Review article: abdominal bloating and distension in functional gastrointestinal disorders--epidemiology and exploration of possible mechanisms. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2008;27(1):2-10.
Agrawal, A., & Whorwell, P. J. (2008). Review article: abdominal bloating and distension in functional gastrointestinal disorders--epidemiology and exploration of possible mechanisms. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 27(1), pp. 2-10.
Agrawal A, Whorwell PJ. Review Article: Abdominal Bloating and Distension in Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders--epidemiology and Exploration of Possible Mechanisms. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2008 Jan 1;27(1):2-10. PubMed PMID: 17931344.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Review article: abdominal bloating and distension in functional gastrointestinal disorders--epidemiology and exploration of possible mechanisms. AU - Agrawal,A, AU - Whorwell,P J, Y1 - 2007/10/11/ PY - 2007/10/13/pubmed PY - 2008/1/10/medline PY - 2007/10/13/entrez SP - 2 EP - 10 JF - Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics JO - Aliment. Pharmacol. Ther. VL - 27 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: A sensation of abdominal bloating, sometimes accompanied by an increase in girth (distension), is one of the most common and most intrusive features of functional bowel disorders. AIM: To conduct a systematic, evidence-based review of the epidemiology and pathophysiology of abdominal bloating and its relationship to distension. METHODS: The terms bloating, distension, functional bowel, irritable bowel syndrome, constipation and diarrhoea were searched on MEDLINE up to 2006. References from selected articles and relevant abstracts were also included. RESULTS: Approximately 50% of irritable bowel syndrome patients with bloating also experience an increase in abdominal girth and this is more pronounced with constipation than diarrhoea. Bloating appears to be more frequently associated with visceral hypersensitivity, whereas distension is more often related to hyposensitivity and delayed transit. Although there is little evidence for excessive gas as a cause of bloating, gas infusion studies suggest that handling of gas may be impaired in irritable bowel syndrome and there may also be abnormal relaxation of the anterior abdominal musculature in these patients. CONCLUSIONS: There is unlikely to be a single cause for bloating and distension, which probably have different, but overlapping, pathophysiological mechanisms. Relieving constipation might help distension, but the treatment of bloating may need more complex approaches involving sensory modulation. SN - 1365-2036 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17931344/Review_article:_abdominal_bloating_and_distension_in_functional_gastrointestinal_disorders__epidemiology_and_exploration_of_possible_mechanisms_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2036.2007.03549.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -