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Racial differences in the living kidney donation experience and implications for education.
Prog Transplant. 2007 Sep; 17(3):234-40.PT

Abstract

CONTEXT

Much has been written about the barriers to deceased organ donation in the African American community. However, relatively little research has been conducted on barriers to living donation among African Americans. A shortage of suitable deceased donor kidneys among African Americans has encouraged donation from living donors.

OBJECTIVE

As a follow-up to several focus groups with health professionals about barriers to living donation and suggestions for educational interventions, we sought to determine kidney donors' thoughts and feelings about their donation.

DESIGN

Telephone interviews with past donors.

PARTICIPANTS

Nine African Americans and 9 whites were selected from a database of laparoscopic donor nephrectomies from 1993 to 2003.

OUTCOME MEASURES

Transcribed phone interviews were reviewed by 3 researchers to determine recurring themes and categorize responses.

RESULTS

Responses were categorized into 8 areas of concern: health, financial, life with 1 kidney, procreation, psychosocial matters, surgery related, success of the transplant, and concerns about the future. Whites (n = 9) tended to volunteer more for laparoscopic kidney donation than did African Americans (n = 2). African American concerns focused on future health and living with only 1 kidney, whereas whites had concerns about the surgery and the medical system.

CONCLUSIONS

Findings indicated that education is the best way to reach living donors and dispell fears. Promoting general health of African Americans may increase their willingness to be a living donor. Altruistic motives are the main motivation for donation, and intervention programs should target groups on a personal level to help individuals see that they can make a difference in improving or saving lives.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17944164

Citation

Lunsford, Shayna L., et al. "Racial Differences in the Living Kidney Donation Experience and Implications for Education." Progress in Transplantation (Aliso Viejo, Calif.), vol. 17, no. 3, 2007, pp. 234-40.
Lunsford SL, Shilling LM, Chavin KD, et al. Racial differences in the living kidney donation experience and implications for education. Prog Transplant. 2007;17(3):234-40.
Lunsford, S. L., Shilling, L. M., Chavin, K. D., Martin, M. S., Miles, L. G., Norman, M. L., & Baliga, P. K. (2007). Racial differences in the living kidney donation experience and implications for education. Progress in Transplantation (Aliso Viejo, Calif.), 17(3), 234-40.
Lunsford SL, et al. Racial Differences in the Living Kidney Donation Experience and Implications for Education. Prog Transplant. 2007;17(3):234-40. PubMed PMID: 17944164.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Racial differences in the living kidney donation experience and implications for education. AU - Lunsford,Shayna L, AU - Shilling,Lilless M, AU - Chavin,Kenneth D, AU - Martin,Margaret S, AU - Miles,Lucia G, AU - Norman,Michele L, AU - Baliga,Prabhakar K, PY - 2007/10/20/pubmed PY - 2007/12/6/medline PY - 2007/10/20/entrez SP - 234 EP - 40 JF - Progress in transplantation (Aliso Viejo, Calif.) JO - Prog Transplant VL - 17 IS - 3 N2 - CONTEXT: Much has been written about the barriers to deceased organ donation in the African American community. However, relatively little research has been conducted on barriers to living donation among African Americans. A shortage of suitable deceased donor kidneys among African Americans has encouraged donation from living donors. OBJECTIVE: As a follow-up to several focus groups with health professionals about barriers to living donation and suggestions for educational interventions, we sought to determine kidney donors' thoughts and feelings about their donation. DESIGN: Telephone interviews with past donors. PARTICIPANTS: Nine African Americans and 9 whites were selected from a database of laparoscopic donor nephrectomies from 1993 to 2003. OUTCOME MEASURES: Transcribed phone interviews were reviewed by 3 researchers to determine recurring themes and categorize responses. RESULTS: Responses were categorized into 8 areas of concern: health, financial, life with 1 kidney, procreation, psychosocial matters, surgery related, success of the transplant, and concerns about the future. Whites (n = 9) tended to volunteer more for laparoscopic kidney donation than did African Americans (n = 2). African American concerns focused on future health and living with only 1 kidney, whereas whites had concerns about the surgery and the medical system. CONCLUSIONS: Findings indicated that education is the best way to reach living donors and dispell fears. Promoting general health of African Americans may increase their willingness to be a living donor. Altruistic motives are the main motivation for donation, and intervention programs should target groups on a personal level to help individuals see that they can make a difference in improving or saving lives. SN - 1526-9248 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17944164/Racial_differences_in_the_living_kidney_donation_experience_and_implications_for_education_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/kidneytransplantation.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -