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The biphasic effects of alcohol: comparisons of subjective and objective measures of stimulation, sedation, and physical activity.
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2007 Nov; 31(11):1883-90.AC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Alcohol produces biphasic effects of both stimulation and sedation. Sensitivity to these effects may increase the risk for the development of alcoholism. Alcohol-induced changes in stimulation and sedation are commonly assessed with self-report questionnaires in human research and with physical activity monitoring in animal research. However, little is known about the effects of alcohol on physical activity or the relationship between physical activity and subjective self-report measures of stimulation and sedation following alcohol consumption in humans.

METHODS

Thirty healthy men and women (n = 15 each) from 21 to 38 years old completed daily measurements of physical activity and self-reports of stimulation and sedation following alcohol or placebo consumption. Across each of the four experimental days, all participants consumed a placebo, 0.4, 0.6, or 0.8 g/kg dose of 95% alcohol in a counterbalanced order. Breath alcohol concentrations, physical activity levels, and self-reported stimulation and sedation were measured at baseline and on the ascending and descending limbs of the breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) curve.

RESULTS

All alcohol doses increased physical activity, but these increases were time- and dose-dependent. Increases in physical activity lasted across both ascending and descending limbs of the BrAC curve. Following the 0.6 g/kg dose, both physical activity and self-reported stimulation increased during the ascending BrAC. Separate analyses of self-reported sedation scores indicated that alcohol consumption also increased sedation for the 0.6 and 0.8 g/kg doses. Physical activity was not significantly correlated with either self-reported stimulation or sedation at any time point.

CONCLUSIONS

These findings suggest that assessments of subjectively measured stimulation and sedation and objectively measured physical activity each assess unique aspects of the effects of alcohol. Used simultaneously, these measures may be useful for examining underlying mechanisms of the effects of alcohol on behavior.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Radiology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17949393

Citation

Addicott, Merideth A., et al. "The Biphasic Effects of Alcohol: Comparisons of Subjective and Objective Measures of Stimulation, Sedation, and Physical Activity." Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 31, no. 11, 2007, pp. 1883-90.
Addicott MA, Marsh-Richard DM, Mathias CW, et al. The biphasic effects of alcohol: comparisons of subjective and objective measures of stimulation, sedation, and physical activity. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2007;31(11):1883-90.
Addicott, M. A., Marsh-Richard, D. M., Mathias, C. W., & Dougherty, D. M. (2007). The biphasic effects of alcohol: comparisons of subjective and objective measures of stimulation, sedation, and physical activity. Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, 31(11), 1883-90.
Addicott MA, et al. The Biphasic Effects of Alcohol: Comparisons of Subjective and Objective Measures of Stimulation, Sedation, and Physical Activity. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2007;31(11):1883-90. PubMed PMID: 17949393.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The biphasic effects of alcohol: comparisons of subjective and objective measures of stimulation, sedation, and physical activity. AU - Addicott,Merideth A, AU - Marsh-Richard,Dawn M, AU - Mathias,Charles W, AU - Dougherty,Donald M, PY - 2007/10/24/pubmed PY - 2008/1/23/medline PY - 2007/10/24/entrez SP - 1883 EP - 90 JF - Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research JO - Alcohol Clin Exp Res VL - 31 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: Alcohol produces biphasic effects of both stimulation and sedation. Sensitivity to these effects may increase the risk for the development of alcoholism. Alcohol-induced changes in stimulation and sedation are commonly assessed with self-report questionnaires in human research and with physical activity monitoring in animal research. However, little is known about the effects of alcohol on physical activity or the relationship between physical activity and subjective self-report measures of stimulation and sedation following alcohol consumption in humans. METHODS: Thirty healthy men and women (n = 15 each) from 21 to 38 years old completed daily measurements of physical activity and self-reports of stimulation and sedation following alcohol or placebo consumption. Across each of the four experimental days, all participants consumed a placebo, 0.4, 0.6, or 0.8 g/kg dose of 95% alcohol in a counterbalanced order. Breath alcohol concentrations, physical activity levels, and self-reported stimulation and sedation were measured at baseline and on the ascending and descending limbs of the breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) curve. RESULTS: All alcohol doses increased physical activity, but these increases were time- and dose-dependent. Increases in physical activity lasted across both ascending and descending limbs of the BrAC curve. Following the 0.6 g/kg dose, both physical activity and self-reported stimulation increased during the ascending BrAC. Separate analyses of self-reported sedation scores indicated that alcohol consumption also increased sedation for the 0.6 and 0.8 g/kg doses. Physical activity was not significantly correlated with either self-reported stimulation or sedation at any time point. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that assessments of subjectively measured stimulation and sedation and objectively measured physical activity each assess unique aspects of the effects of alcohol. Used simultaneously, these measures may be useful for examining underlying mechanisms of the effects of alcohol on behavior. SN - 0145-6008 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17949393/The_biphasic_effects_of_alcohol:_comparisons_of_subjective_and_objective_measures_of_stimulation_sedation_and_physical_activity_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1530-0277.2007.00518.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -