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Effect of coenzyme Q(10) supplementation on simvastatin-induced myalgia.
Am J Cardiol. 2007 Nov 01; 100(9):1400-3.AJ

Abstract

Myalgia is the most frequently reported adverse side effect associated with statin therapy and often necessitates reduction in dose, or the cessation of therapy, compromising cardiovascular risk management. One postulated mechanism for statin-related myalgia is mitochondrial dysfunction through the depletion of coenzyme Q(10), a key component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. This pilot study evaluated the effect of coenzyme Q(10) supplementation on statin tolerance and myalgia in patients with previous statin-related myalgia. Forty-four patients were randomized to coenzyme Q(10) (200 mg/day) or placebo for 12 weeks in combination with upward dose titration of simvastatin from 10 mg/day, doubling every 4 weeks if tolerated to a maximum of 40 mg/day. Patients experiencing significant myalgia reduced their statin dose or discontinued treatment. Myalgia was assessed using a visual analogue scale. There was no difference between combined therapy and statin alone in the myalgia score change (median 6.0 [interquartile range 2.1 to 8.8] vs 2.3 [0 to 12.8], p = 0.63), in the number of patients tolerating simvastatin 40 mg/day (16 of 22 [73%] with coenzyme Q(10) vs 13 of 22 [59%] with placebo, p = 0.34), or in the number of patients remaining on therapy (16 of 22 [73%] with coenzyme Q(10) vs 18 of 22 [82%] with placebo, p = 0.47). In conclusion, coenzyme Q(10) supplementation did not improve statin tolerance or myalgia, although further studies are warranted.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Lipid and Diabetes Research Group, Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch, New Zealand. joanna.young@cdhb.govt.nzNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17950797

Citation

Young, Joanna M., et al. "Effect of Coenzyme Q(10) Supplementation On Simvastatin-induced Myalgia." The American Journal of Cardiology, vol. 100, no. 9, 2007, pp. 1400-3.
Young JM, Florkowski CM, Molyneux SL, et al. Effect of coenzyme Q(10) supplementation on simvastatin-induced myalgia. Am J Cardiol. 2007;100(9):1400-3.
Young, J. M., Florkowski, C. M., Molyneux, S. L., McEwan, R. G., Frampton, C. M., George, P. M., & Scott, R. S. (2007). Effect of coenzyme Q(10) supplementation on simvastatin-induced myalgia. The American Journal of Cardiology, 100(9), 1400-3.
Young JM, et al. Effect of Coenzyme Q(10) Supplementation On Simvastatin-induced Myalgia. Am J Cardiol. 2007 Nov 1;100(9):1400-3. PubMed PMID: 17950797.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of coenzyme Q(10) supplementation on simvastatin-induced myalgia. AU - Young,Joanna M, AU - Florkowski,Christopher M, AU - Molyneux,Sarah L, AU - McEwan,Roberta G, AU - Frampton,Christopher M, AU - George,Peter M, AU - Scott,Russell S, Y1 - 2007/08/16/ PY - 2007/03/06/received PY - 2007/06/05/revised PY - 2007/06/05/accepted PY - 2007/10/24/pubmed PY - 2007/12/21/medline PY - 2007/10/24/entrez SP - 1400 EP - 3 JF - The American journal of cardiology JO - Am. J. Cardiol. VL - 100 IS - 9 N2 - Myalgia is the most frequently reported adverse side effect associated with statin therapy and often necessitates reduction in dose, or the cessation of therapy, compromising cardiovascular risk management. One postulated mechanism for statin-related myalgia is mitochondrial dysfunction through the depletion of coenzyme Q(10), a key component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. This pilot study evaluated the effect of coenzyme Q(10) supplementation on statin tolerance and myalgia in patients with previous statin-related myalgia. Forty-four patients were randomized to coenzyme Q(10) (200 mg/day) or placebo for 12 weeks in combination with upward dose titration of simvastatin from 10 mg/day, doubling every 4 weeks if tolerated to a maximum of 40 mg/day. Patients experiencing significant myalgia reduced their statin dose or discontinued treatment. Myalgia was assessed using a visual analogue scale. There was no difference between combined therapy and statin alone in the myalgia score change (median 6.0 [interquartile range 2.1 to 8.8] vs 2.3 [0 to 12.8], p = 0.63), in the number of patients tolerating simvastatin 40 mg/day (16 of 22 [73%] with coenzyme Q(10) vs 13 of 22 [59%] with placebo, p = 0.34), or in the number of patients remaining on therapy (16 of 22 [73%] with coenzyme Q(10) vs 18 of 22 [82%] with placebo, p = 0.47). In conclusion, coenzyme Q(10) supplementation did not improve statin tolerance or myalgia, although further studies are warranted. SN - 0002-9149 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17950797/Effect_of_coenzyme_Q_10__supplementation_on_simvastatin_induced_myalgia_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-9149(07)01457-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -