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Gabapentin.
Prog Brain Res. 2007; 166:287-301.PB

Abstract

Several lines of evidence suggest that loss of central inhibition after deprivation of input from the ear (peripheral deafferentation) may be one cause of chronic tinnitus. Aging and acoustic trauma, the two most common causes of peripheral damage to the auditory system, each decrease input to central auditory structures. Loss of input to tonic inhibitory systems would release excitatory structures from inhibitory regulation. The increased activity resulting may be interpreted by more rostral structures in the auditory pathway as tinnitus. Down-regulation of gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA), a major inhibitory neurotransmitter of the central auditory pathway, is a potential mechanism for the loss of inhibition. Both animal studies and human clinical trials implicate loss of inhibition, and specifically loss of GABA function, in the development of acoustic trauma-induced tinnitus.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Division of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Springfield, IL 62794, USA. cbauer@siumed.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17956793

Citation

Bauer, Carol A., and Thomas J. Brozoski. "Gabapentin." Progress in Brain Research, vol. 166, 2007, pp. 287-301.
Bauer CA, Brozoski TJ. Gabapentin. Prog Brain Res. 2007;166:287-301.
Bauer, C. A., & Brozoski, T. J. (2007). Gabapentin. Progress in Brain Research, 166, 287-301.
Bauer CA, Brozoski TJ. Gabapentin. Prog Brain Res. 2007;166:287-301. PubMed PMID: 17956793.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gabapentin. AU - Bauer,Carol A, AU - Brozoski,Thomas J, PY - 2007/10/25/pubmed PY - 2008/1/11/medline PY - 2007/10/25/entrez SP - 287 EP - 301 JF - Progress in brain research JO - Prog. Brain Res. VL - 166 N2 - Several lines of evidence suggest that loss of central inhibition after deprivation of input from the ear (peripheral deafferentation) may be one cause of chronic tinnitus. Aging and acoustic trauma, the two most common causes of peripheral damage to the auditory system, each decrease input to central auditory structures. Loss of input to tonic inhibitory systems would release excitatory structures from inhibitory regulation. The increased activity resulting may be interpreted by more rostral structures in the auditory pathway as tinnitus. Down-regulation of gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA), a major inhibitory neurotransmitter of the central auditory pathway, is a potential mechanism for the loss of inhibition. Both animal studies and human clinical trials implicate loss of inhibition, and specifically loss of GABA function, in the development of acoustic trauma-induced tinnitus. SN - 0079-6123 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17956793/Gabapentin_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0079-6123(07)66027-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -