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The effects of fish oil supplementation in pregnancy on breast milk fatty acid composition over the course of lactation: a randomized controlled trial.
Pediatr Res. 2007 Dec; 62(6):689-94.PR

Abstract

This study evaluated the longitudinal effect of fish oil in pregnancy on breast milk fatty acid composition and infant outcomes. In a randomized, controlled trial, 98 women received 2.2 g docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and 1.1 g eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) or olive oil from 20 wk of gestation until delivery. Fatty acid composition in breast milk (at 3 d, 6 wk, and 6 mo) and infant erythrocyte membranes (at 1 y) were determined by gas liquid chromatography. Breast milk fatty acids were examined in relationship to growth and development. Compared with control group, breast milk from women who received fish oil had proportionally higher DHA and EPA levels at 3 d and 6 wk after delivery, but this difference was no longer apparent by 6 mo. Infant DHA status at 1 y of age was directly related to DHA levels at 3 d, 6 wk, and 6 mo postpartum (but not to antenatal supplementation). Both EPA and DHA in breast milk were positively correlated with Griffith's developmental scores including hand and eye coordination. Thus, supplementation in pregnancy was associated with increased n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) in breast milk, particularly in early lactation, and this was positively associated with infant DHA status at 1 y.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Paediatrics and Child Health, The University of Western Australia, Crawley WA 6009.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17957152

Citation

Dunstan, Janet A., et al. "The Effects of Fish Oil Supplementation in Pregnancy On Breast Milk Fatty Acid Composition Over the Course of Lactation: a Randomized Controlled Trial." Pediatric Research, vol. 62, no. 6, 2007, pp. 689-94.
Dunstan JA, Mitoulas LR, Dixon G, et al. The effects of fish oil supplementation in pregnancy on breast milk fatty acid composition over the course of lactation: a randomized controlled trial. Pediatr Res. 2007;62(6):689-94.
Dunstan, J. A., Mitoulas, L. R., Dixon, G., Doherty, D. A., Hartmann, P. E., Simmer, K., & Prescott, S. L. (2007). The effects of fish oil supplementation in pregnancy on breast milk fatty acid composition over the course of lactation: a randomized controlled trial. Pediatric Research, 62(6), 689-94.
Dunstan JA, et al. The Effects of Fish Oil Supplementation in Pregnancy On Breast Milk Fatty Acid Composition Over the Course of Lactation: a Randomized Controlled Trial. Pediatr Res. 2007;62(6):689-94. PubMed PMID: 17957152.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The effects of fish oil supplementation in pregnancy on breast milk fatty acid composition over the course of lactation: a randomized controlled trial. AU - Dunstan,Janet A, AU - Mitoulas,Leon R, AU - Dixon,Glenys, AU - Doherty,Dorota A, AU - Hartmann,Peter E, AU - Simmer,Karen, AU - Prescott,Susan L, PY - 2007/10/25/pubmed PY - 2007/12/21/medline PY - 2007/10/25/entrez SP - 689 EP - 94 JF - Pediatric research JO - Pediatr Res VL - 62 IS - 6 N2 - This study evaluated the longitudinal effect of fish oil in pregnancy on breast milk fatty acid composition and infant outcomes. In a randomized, controlled trial, 98 women received 2.2 g docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and 1.1 g eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) or olive oil from 20 wk of gestation until delivery. Fatty acid composition in breast milk (at 3 d, 6 wk, and 6 mo) and infant erythrocyte membranes (at 1 y) were determined by gas liquid chromatography. Breast milk fatty acids were examined in relationship to growth and development. Compared with control group, breast milk from women who received fish oil had proportionally higher DHA and EPA levels at 3 d and 6 wk after delivery, but this difference was no longer apparent by 6 mo. Infant DHA status at 1 y of age was directly related to DHA levels at 3 d, 6 wk, and 6 mo postpartum (but not to antenatal supplementation). Both EPA and DHA in breast milk were positively correlated with Griffith's developmental scores including hand and eye coordination. Thus, supplementation in pregnancy was associated with increased n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) in breast milk, particularly in early lactation, and this was positively associated with infant DHA status at 1 y. SN - 0031-3998 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17957152/The_effects_of_fish_oil_supplementation_in_pregnancy_on_breast_milk_fatty_acid_composition_over_the_course_of_lactation:_a_randomized_controlled_trial_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1203/PDR.0b013e318159a93a DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -