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A dynamic object-processing network: metric shape discrimination of dynamic objects by activation of occipitotemporal, parietal, and frontal cortices.
Cereb Cortex. 2008 Jun; 18(6):1302-13.CC

Abstract

Shape perception is important for object recognition. However, behavioral studies have shown that rigid motion also contributes directly to the recognition process, in addition to providing visual cues to shape. Using psychophysics and functional brain imaging, we investigated the neural mechanisms involved in shape and motion processing for dynamic object recognition. Observers discriminated between pairs of rotating novel objects in which the 3-dimensional shape difference between the pair was systematically varied in metric steps. In addition, the objects rotated in either the same or the different direction to determine the effect of task-irrelevant motion on behavior and neural activity. We found that observers' shape discrimination performance increased systematically with shape differences, as did the hemodynamic responses of occipitotemporal, parietal, and frontal regions. Furthermore, responses in occipital regions were only correlated with observers' perceived shape differences. We also found different effects of object motion on shape discrimination across observers, which were reflected in responses of the superior temporal sulcus. These results suggest a network of regions that are involved in the discrimination of metric shape differences for dynamic object recognition.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Cognitive and Computational Psychophysics, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17962220

Citation

Schultz, Johannes, et al. "A Dynamic Object-processing Network: Metric Shape Discrimination of Dynamic Objects By Activation of Occipitotemporal, Parietal, and Frontal Cortices." Cerebral Cortex (New York, N.Y. : 1991), vol. 18, no. 6, 2008, pp. 1302-13.
Schultz J, Chuang L, Vuong QC. A dynamic object-processing network: metric shape discrimination of dynamic objects by activation of occipitotemporal, parietal, and frontal cortices. Cereb Cortex. 2008;18(6):1302-13.
Schultz, J., Chuang, L., & Vuong, Q. C. (2008). A dynamic object-processing network: metric shape discrimination of dynamic objects by activation of occipitotemporal, parietal, and frontal cortices. Cerebral Cortex (New York, N.Y. : 1991), 18(6), 1302-13.
Schultz J, Chuang L, Vuong QC. A Dynamic Object-processing Network: Metric Shape Discrimination of Dynamic Objects By Activation of Occipitotemporal, Parietal, and Frontal Cortices. Cereb Cortex. 2008;18(6):1302-13. PubMed PMID: 17962220.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A dynamic object-processing network: metric shape discrimination of dynamic objects by activation of occipitotemporal, parietal, and frontal cortices. AU - Schultz,Johannes, AU - Chuang,Lewis, AU - Vuong,Quoc C, Y1 - 2007/10/24/ PY - 2007/10/27/pubmed PY - 2008/9/26/medline PY - 2007/10/27/entrez SP - 1302 EP - 13 JF - Cerebral cortex (New York, N.Y. : 1991) JO - Cereb. Cortex VL - 18 IS - 6 N2 - Shape perception is important for object recognition. However, behavioral studies have shown that rigid motion also contributes directly to the recognition process, in addition to providing visual cues to shape. Using psychophysics and functional brain imaging, we investigated the neural mechanisms involved in shape and motion processing for dynamic object recognition. Observers discriminated between pairs of rotating novel objects in which the 3-dimensional shape difference between the pair was systematically varied in metric steps. In addition, the objects rotated in either the same or the different direction to determine the effect of task-irrelevant motion on behavior and neural activity. We found that observers' shape discrimination performance increased systematically with shape differences, as did the hemodynamic responses of occipitotemporal, parietal, and frontal regions. Furthermore, responses in occipital regions were only correlated with observers' perceived shape differences. We also found different effects of object motion on shape discrimination across observers, which were reflected in responses of the superior temporal sulcus. These results suggest a network of regions that are involved in the discrimination of metric shape differences for dynamic object recognition. SN - 1460-2199 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17962220/A_dynamic_object_processing_network:_metric_shape_discrimination_of_dynamic_objects_by_activation_of_occipitotemporal_parietal_and_frontal_cortices_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/cercor/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/cercor/bhm162 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -