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The incidence and impact of increased body mass index on maternal and fetal morbidity in the low-risk primigravid population.
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med 2007; 20(12):879-83JM

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the incidence and impact of increased body mass index (BMI) on maternal and fetal morbidity in the low-risk primigravid population.

METHODS

This was a prospective study with retrospective analysis of delivery outcome data. All low-risk primigravida who met the inclusion criteria during the recruitment period were approached. BMI was calculated using the formula weight/height squared. The participants were divided into five categories: 'underweight' (BMI <20 kg/m2), 'normal' (BMI 20.01-25 kg/m2), 'overweight' (BMI 25.01-30 kg/m2), 'obese' (BMI 30.01-40 kg/m2), and 'morbidly obese' (BMI >40 kg/m2). Maternal outcomes evaluated included gestation at delivery, onset of labor (spontaneous/induced/elective cesarean section), length of labor, use of oxytocin and epidural, mode of delivery, and estimated blood loss. Perinatal outcome measures included infant birth weight (kg) and centile, gestational age, ponderal index, Apgar score <7 at 5 minutes, cord pH <7.1, presence of meconium grade 3 at delivery, degree of resuscitation required, admission to neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), and duration of stay.

RESULTS

One thousand and eleven women participated in the study. Complete outcome data were available for 833 women (82%). A significant difference was identified in gestation at delivery between the subgroups (p < 0.004). A significant positive correlation was identified between cesarean section rates with increasing BMI, even when gestation was controlled for (p = 0.004). Similarly, women in the normal BMI group remained significantly less likely to have an infant requiring NICU admission than obese women (2.2% vs. 8.6%; p = 0.011).

CONCLUSION

High BMI is associated with longer gestations, higher operative delivery rates, and an increased rate of neonatal intensive care admission

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Rotunda Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. rupaksarkar@hotmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17963180

Citation

Sarkar, Rupak K., et al. "The Incidence and Impact of Increased Body Mass Index On Maternal and Fetal Morbidity in the Low-risk Primigravid Population." The Journal of Maternal-fetal & Neonatal Medicine : the Official Journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians, vol. 20, no. 12, 2007, pp. 879-83.
Sarkar RK, Cooley SM, Donnelly JC, et al. The incidence and impact of increased body mass index on maternal and fetal morbidity in the low-risk primigravid population. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2007;20(12):879-83.
Sarkar, R. K., Cooley, S. M., Donnelly, J. C., Walsh, T., Collins, C., & Geary, M. P. (2007). The incidence and impact of increased body mass index on maternal and fetal morbidity in the low-risk primigravid population. The Journal of Maternal-fetal & Neonatal Medicine : the Official Journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians, 20(12), pp. 879-83.
Sarkar RK, et al. The Incidence and Impact of Increased Body Mass Index On Maternal and Fetal Morbidity in the Low-risk Primigravid Population. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2007;20(12):879-83. PubMed PMID: 17963180.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The incidence and impact of increased body mass index on maternal and fetal morbidity in the low-risk primigravid population. AU - Sarkar,Rupak K, AU - Cooley,Sharon M, AU - Donnelly,Jennifer C, AU - Walsh,Thomas, AU - Collins,Claire, AU - Geary,Michael P, PY - 2007/10/27/pubmed PY - 2008/3/19/medline PY - 2007/10/27/entrez SP - 879 EP - 83 JF - The journal of maternal-fetal & neonatal medicine : the official journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians JO - J. Matern. Fetal. Neonatal. Med. VL - 20 IS - 12 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence and impact of increased body mass index (BMI) on maternal and fetal morbidity in the low-risk primigravid population. METHODS: This was a prospective study with retrospective analysis of delivery outcome data. All low-risk primigravida who met the inclusion criteria during the recruitment period were approached. BMI was calculated using the formula weight/height squared. The participants were divided into five categories: 'underweight' (BMI <20 kg/m2), 'normal' (BMI 20.01-25 kg/m2), 'overweight' (BMI 25.01-30 kg/m2), 'obese' (BMI 30.01-40 kg/m2), and 'morbidly obese' (BMI >40 kg/m2). Maternal outcomes evaluated included gestation at delivery, onset of labor (spontaneous/induced/elective cesarean section), length of labor, use of oxytocin and epidural, mode of delivery, and estimated blood loss. Perinatal outcome measures included infant birth weight (kg) and centile, gestational age, ponderal index, Apgar score <7 at 5 minutes, cord pH <7.1, presence of meconium grade 3 at delivery, degree of resuscitation required, admission to neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), and duration of stay. RESULTS: One thousand and eleven women participated in the study. Complete outcome data were available for 833 women (82%). A significant difference was identified in gestation at delivery between the subgroups (p < 0.004). A significant positive correlation was identified between cesarean section rates with increasing BMI, even when gestation was controlled for (p = 0.004). Similarly, women in the normal BMI group remained significantly less likely to have an infant requiring NICU admission than obese women (2.2% vs. 8.6%; p = 0.011). CONCLUSION: High BMI is associated with longer gestations, higher operative delivery rates, and an increased rate of neonatal intensive care admission SN - 1476-7058 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17963180/The_incidence_and_impact_of_increased_body_mass_index_on_maternal_and_fetal_morbidity_in_the_low_risk_primigravid_population_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14767050701713090 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -