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Emergency department activation of an interventional cardiology team reduces door-to-balloon times in ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction.
Ann Emerg Med. 2007 Nov; 50(5):538-44.AE

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVE

American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology guidelines recommend door-to-balloon times of fewer than 90 minutes in patients with acute ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction. We hypothesized that immediate activation of an interventional cardiology team (code H) would reduce the time to percutaneous coronary intervention by 1 hour and increase the proportion of patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention within 90 minutes of arrival.

METHODS

Study design was a before-and-after trial in an academic suburban emergency department (ED) with a certified cardiac catheterization laboratory. Subjects were a consecutive sample of patients presenting to the ED with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction evident on the initial ECG. Patients without chest pain and refusing catheterization were excluded. The intervention was the use of a central paging system for activation of the interventional cardiology team (attending physician, fellow, nurse, technician) by emergency physicians in patients presenting to the ED with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction. Measures were demographic and clinical information collected with standardized data collection forms. Outcomes were door-to-balloon times and the proportion of patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention within 90 minutes of arrival. Groups were compared with chi2 and t tests.

RESULTS

There were 97 patients included in the study; 43 were treated in the 2 years before implementation of the code H and 54 patients were treated the subsequent 2 years. Mean age (SD) was 56.9 years (13.7), 27% were women, and 86% were white. Groups were similar in age, sex, and race. Implementation of a code H reduced the median door-to-balloon time by 68 minutes (from 176 to 108 minutes; P<.001) and increased the proportion of patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention within 90 minutes from 2.8% to 29.0% (mean difference 26.5; 95% confidence interval 15.0 to 36.9). To determine whether further improvements occurred, 48 patients treated in 2006 showed a 20-minute further reduction in door-to-balloon time; 52% underwent angioplasty within 90 minutes of ED presentation.

CONCLUSION

Institutional implementation of a protocol that requires emergency physicians to activate an interventional cardiology team response in ED patients with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction reduces the door-to-balloon time and increases the proportion of patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention within 90 minutes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Emergency Medicine, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8500, USA. adam.singer@stonybrook.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17963981

Citation

Singer, Adam J., et al. "Emergency Department Activation of an Interventional Cardiology Team Reduces Door-to-balloon Times in ST-segment-elevation Myocardial Infarction." Annals of Emergency Medicine, vol. 50, no. 5, 2007, pp. 538-44.
Singer AJ, Shembekar A, Visram F, et al. Emergency department activation of an interventional cardiology team reduces door-to-balloon times in ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction. Ann Emerg Med. 2007;50(5):538-44.
Singer, A. J., Shembekar, A., Visram, F., Schiller, J., Russo, V., Lawson, W., Gomes, C. A., Santora, C., Maliszewski, M., Wilbert, L., Dowdy, E., Viccellio, P., & Henry, M. C. (2007). Emergency department activation of an interventional cardiology team reduces door-to-balloon times in ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction. Annals of Emergency Medicine, 50(5), 538-44.
Singer AJ, et al. Emergency Department Activation of an Interventional Cardiology Team Reduces Door-to-balloon Times in ST-segment-elevation Myocardial Infarction. Ann Emerg Med. 2007;50(5):538-44. PubMed PMID: 17963981.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Emergency department activation of an interventional cardiology team reduces door-to-balloon times in ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction. AU - Singer,Adam J, AU - Shembekar,Amit, AU - Visram,Farid, AU - Schiller,Joshua, AU - Russo,Valerie, AU - Lawson,William, AU - Gomes,Carol A, AU - Santora,Carolyn, AU - Maliszewski,Mary, AU - Wilbert,Lisa, AU - Dowdy,Eileen, AU - Viccellio,Peter, AU - Henry,Mark C, PY - 2007/01/25/received PY - 2007/04/17/revised PY - 2007/06/04/accepted PY - 2007/10/30/pubmed PY - 2007/11/9/medline PY - 2007/10/30/entrez SP - 538 EP - 44 JF - Annals of emergency medicine JO - Ann Emerg Med VL - 50 IS - 5 N2 - STUDY OBJECTIVE: American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology guidelines recommend door-to-balloon times of fewer than 90 minutes in patients with acute ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction. We hypothesized that immediate activation of an interventional cardiology team (code H) would reduce the time to percutaneous coronary intervention by 1 hour and increase the proportion of patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention within 90 minutes of arrival. METHODS: Study design was a before-and-after trial in an academic suburban emergency department (ED) with a certified cardiac catheterization laboratory. Subjects were a consecutive sample of patients presenting to the ED with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction evident on the initial ECG. Patients without chest pain and refusing catheterization were excluded. The intervention was the use of a central paging system for activation of the interventional cardiology team (attending physician, fellow, nurse, technician) by emergency physicians in patients presenting to the ED with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction. Measures were demographic and clinical information collected with standardized data collection forms. Outcomes were door-to-balloon times and the proportion of patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention within 90 minutes of arrival. Groups were compared with chi2 and t tests. RESULTS: There were 97 patients included in the study; 43 were treated in the 2 years before implementation of the code H and 54 patients were treated the subsequent 2 years. Mean age (SD) was 56.9 years (13.7), 27% were women, and 86% were white. Groups were similar in age, sex, and race. Implementation of a code H reduced the median door-to-balloon time by 68 minutes (from 176 to 108 minutes; P<.001) and increased the proportion of patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention within 90 minutes from 2.8% to 29.0% (mean difference 26.5; 95% confidence interval 15.0 to 36.9). To determine whether further improvements occurred, 48 patients treated in 2006 showed a 20-minute further reduction in door-to-balloon time; 52% underwent angioplasty within 90 minutes of ED presentation. CONCLUSION: Institutional implementation of a protocol that requires emergency physicians to activate an interventional cardiology team response in ED patients with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction reduces the door-to-balloon time and increases the proportion of patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention within 90 minutes. SN - 1097-6760 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17963981/Emergency_department_activation_of_an_interventional_cardiology_team_reduces_door_to_balloon_times_in_ST_segment_elevation_myocardial_infarction_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0196-0644(07)01249-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -