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Glycomacropeptide (GMP) is not critical to whey-induced satiety, but may have a unique role in energy intake regulation through cholecystokinin (CCK).
Physiol Behav. 2008 Jan 28; 93(1-2):379-87.PB

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Whey protein is more satiating than other protein types, including casein. We hypothesized that enhanced satiety with whey protein is related to glycomacropeptide (GMP) content, a stimulator of cholecystokinin (CCK).

OBJECTIVES

To investigate the role of GMP in whey protein-induced satiety, as measured by subjective satiety, CCK release and food intake at a test meal in healthy weight men and women.

DESIGN

In a within-subjects design, twenty subjects (n=10 men, 10 women) consumed 1 of 4 preload shakes (300 mL, 1 MJ), 1 week apart. Preloads differed by protein source and content: Whey; whey protein isolate, Whey (-)GMP; whey protein without GMP, Control; low protein, GMP; GMP isolate. Protein energy of preloads was 44, 44, 2 and 3%, respectively. Subjective satiety and CCK were measured at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75 and 105 min post-preload consumption. A lunch test meal was provided at 75 min. Food records were completed weekly.

RESULTS

Pre-meal satiety was greater after whey protein preloads compared to Control and GMP preloads in women, but no difference was evident in men (sex by preload, p<0.03). CCK concentrations followed a pattern that predicted the subjective satiety in women, but not in men. Test meal intake was not different by preload; however, compensation relative to usual daily intake was achieved after whey-containing- and GMP-containing preloads in women and after GMP and Control preloads in men.

CONCLUSIONS

GMP alone is not critical in pre-meal whey-induced satiety; however, it may have a unique role in compensatory intake regulation managing daily energy intake.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis One Shields Ave., Davis, CA 95616, United States. bbfreeman@ucdavis.edu

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17964616

Citation

Burton-Freeman, Britt M.. "Glycomacropeptide (GMP) Is Not Critical to Whey-induced Satiety, but May Have a Unique Role in Energy Intake Regulation Through Cholecystokinin (CCK)." Physiology & Behavior, vol. 93, no. 1-2, 2008, pp. 379-87.
Burton-Freeman BM. Glycomacropeptide (GMP) is not critical to whey-induced satiety, but may have a unique role in energy intake regulation through cholecystokinin (CCK). Physiol Behav. 2008;93(1-2):379-87.
Burton-Freeman, B. M. (2008). Glycomacropeptide (GMP) is not critical to whey-induced satiety, but may have a unique role in energy intake regulation through cholecystokinin (CCK). Physiology & Behavior, 93(1-2), 379-87.
Burton-Freeman BM. Glycomacropeptide (GMP) Is Not Critical to Whey-induced Satiety, but May Have a Unique Role in Energy Intake Regulation Through Cholecystokinin (CCK). Physiol Behav. 2008 Jan 28;93(1-2):379-87. PubMed PMID: 17964616.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Glycomacropeptide (GMP) is not critical to whey-induced satiety, but may have a unique role in energy intake regulation through cholecystokinin (CCK). A1 - Burton-Freeman,Britt M, Y1 - 2007/10/26/ PY - 2007/06/01/received PY - 2007/09/18/revised PY - 2007/09/19/accepted PY - 2007/10/30/pubmed PY - 2008/4/23/medline PY - 2007/10/30/entrez SP - 379 EP - 87 JF - Physiology & behavior JO - Physiol. Behav. VL - 93 IS - 1-2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Whey protein is more satiating than other protein types, including casein. We hypothesized that enhanced satiety with whey protein is related to glycomacropeptide (GMP) content, a stimulator of cholecystokinin (CCK). OBJECTIVES: To investigate the role of GMP in whey protein-induced satiety, as measured by subjective satiety, CCK release and food intake at a test meal in healthy weight men and women. DESIGN: In a within-subjects design, twenty subjects (n=10 men, 10 women) consumed 1 of 4 preload shakes (300 mL, 1 MJ), 1 week apart. Preloads differed by protein source and content: Whey; whey protein isolate, Whey (-)GMP; whey protein without GMP, Control; low protein, GMP; GMP isolate. Protein energy of preloads was 44, 44, 2 and 3%, respectively. Subjective satiety and CCK were measured at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75 and 105 min post-preload consumption. A lunch test meal was provided at 75 min. Food records were completed weekly. RESULTS: Pre-meal satiety was greater after whey protein preloads compared to Control and GMP preloads in women, but no difference was evident in men (sex by preload, p<0.03). CCK concentrations followed a pattern that predicted the subjective satiety in women, but not in men. Test meal intake was not different by preload; however, compensation relative to usual daily intake was achieved after whey-containing- and GMP-containing preloads in women and after GMP and Control preloads in men. CONCLUSIONS: GMP alone is not critical in pre-meal whey-induced satiety; however, it may have a unique role in compensatory intake regulation managing daily energy intake. SN - 0031-9384 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17964616/Glycomacropeptide__GMP__is_not_critical_to_whey_induced_satiety_but_may_have_a_unique_role_in_energy_intake_regulation_through_cholecystokinin__CCK__ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0031-9384(07)00378-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -